Schedule

You may download the full conference program here: 2018 ICED Program

8:00am to 9:00am
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How do they feel?: The role of emotions in teaching development programming

Room: Maplewood B
Morgan Iommi, Kirk Robinson
Session Track: Graduate Student Professional Development
Emotions impact learning; however, this is often overlooked in the teaching we do as educational developers. By exploring these emotional considerations, we can design more effective programming experiences and motivate participation to achieve institutional change. Using two research studies that looked at graduate student instructors’ experienced and anticipated emotions with teaching development as a foundation, session participants will consider how emotions might shape individuals’ experiences with Center programming. Participants will explore a range of positive and negative emotions, analyze how different elements of programming and marketing might evoke emotions, and begin a plan to effectively utilize emotions to benefit programming.

Focusing on Online Faculty Effectiveness: Aligning Faculty Expectations with Measurements

Room: Dunwoody A
Ying Iverson, Curtis Brant
Session Track: Organizational Development
Join us for an interesting and thought-provoking conversation on launching a comprehensive, continuous quality improvement model for online faculty development. The re-envisioned model creates the conceptual map for professional development/training, performance management, and recognition/career pathways with integrated metrics. Members from Capella University will share the results of their efforts to set clear expectations for faculty performance with data and aligned support services.  Discussion will include how this model impacted institutional culture and faculty behavior with the support of different data and tools. Participants will leave this session with a blueprint for rethinking how to align organizational changes and resources with their faculty development efforts and a deeper understanding on how faculty data supporting behavior changes.

Developing Global Perspectives on Well-Being

Room: Maplewood A
James Fortney
Session Track: Diversity
In recent years, educational developers have been asked to consider our role in the creation of academic cultures that foster individual, community, and institutional well-being (Harward, 2016). For Shuster (2018) and others, “well-being embodies a sense of direction and purpose, positive personal identity, strong relationships, empathy, resilience, and mindfulness” (p. 1). Several scholars are currently exploring these elements of well-being as they relate to both the philosophical and practical dimensions of our work (e.g., Boye, 2018; DiPietro, 2018; Gravett & Bernhagen, 2018). This workshop seeks to contribute to these conversations by developing global perspectives on well-being in educational development.

Inclusive Pedagogy: Challenges & Strategies

Room: Camellia
Donna Troka, Sarah MacDonald
Session Track: Diversity
The concept of “inclusive pedagogy” recognizes the value and challenges of having many different and diverse students learning together. This pre-conference workshop on inclusive pedagogy has three objectives.  First, we will briefly overview current theory and practice that informs inclusive pedagogy. Second, we will discuss barriers and challenges to inclusivity at our own institutions. Third, we will work together to develop practical strategies for creating more inclusive classrooms. Inclusive teaching recognizes that encountering difference can be an important catalyst to learning—but this learning will more effectively occur when all students are included and sufficiently supported.

Students as Partners in Educational Development

Room: Gardenia
Tim Boon, Ine Rens, Rebecca Resseler
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
A challenge for educational developers is getting all teachers involved in the (re)design of their course. Some teachers want hands-on assistance. But as an educational development unit we don’t have the manpower to work on this micro-level. Meanwhile the involvement of students in higher education is gaining importance. The voice of students is considered key to improve the teaching and learning practice. At KU Leuven, we recently decided to experiment with students redesigning the online part of courses, making these courses better organized and more (attr)active. Do you involve students in educational design? Would you like to? Let’s share our ideas.

“Student Engagement” and its Relationship to Effective Teaching & Learning: What Is It, Why Does It Matter, and How What Does It Mean for Our Work?

Room: Oakwood B
Michael Reder
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
  What is “student engagement”—a term particularly popular these days in higher education—and why is it so important to student learning and to your work as an educational developer?  This interactive, evidence-informed workshop will ask participants to reflect upon the characteristics of effective teaching that lead to significant student learning, particularly in relationship to current theories about student learning (e.g., the role of emotions in learning), equitable education, and “high-impact” experiences.  We will discuss the most recent research on effective teaching, and discuss what an engaged student looks like in a variety of international contexts.   

Institutional climate for teaching and innovation as perceived by instructors

Room: Dunwoody C
Wayne Jacobson, Renee Cole, Jean Florman
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The effectiveness of initiatives to improve teaching and learning rests on understanding institutional capacity and readiness for change.  To better understand capacity and readiness for change on our campus, we engaged in a systematic study of climate for teaching as perceived by instructors.  Methodologies included classroom observations, surveys of classroom practices and the perceived climate for teaching innovation, and interviews with faculty members and department chairs.  Findings reveal misalignment in many cases between perceived and actual practices, and understandings of climate for change and the value of evidence-based teaching that vary widely among faculty and between faculty and educational developers.  

Transforming Ourselves and Initiating Change through Effective Leadership

Room: Oakwood A
Esther Zirbel
Session Track: Organizational Development
This model of leading with “soul,” “heart,” and “mind” combines four leadership models from the literature into one coherent framework.  In the soul section, participants will identify their strengths and virtues through an abbreviated LPI assessment; in the heart section, they will use their emotional and social/conversational intelligences to understand leadership practices; and in the mind section, they will use results from cognitive neuroscience to act and lead consciously, wholeheartedly, and responsibly.  The idea is that by learning effective leadership skills, faculty developers will be positioned and empowered to initiate change in teaching and learning at their institution.  

Creating Your Educational Development Philosophy Statement

Room: Dunwoody B
Carol Berenson, Natasha Kenny
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
An educational development philosophy statement communicates your fundamental beliefs about educational development, why your hold these beliefs, and how you translate your beliefs into practice as an educational developer (McDonald et al., 2016).  Although educational development philosophy statements are a relatively new phenomenon, they are beginning to be seen as relevant for job applications, for professional learning, and for tenure and promotion processes (Kenny et al., 2017; Kalu et al., in press). In this session, we will draw upon the work of McDonald et al. (2016) and Kalu et al. (in press) to guide participants through a process of reflecting upon and creating their own educational development philosophy statement.   
9:15am to 10:45am
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Hearing Different Voices: Teaching about Sustainability in Chinese Higher Education

Room: Maplewood A
Debby Cotton
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Environmental sustainability is slowly starting to become embedded into Educational Development practices. However, as in many educational research areas, much key literature is from Europe or the US. This paper reports research into HE teaching in China, drawing out implications for educational development internationally. The study utilised a culturally sensitive interpretive research strategy involving 30 Faculty in 3 Chinese universities. The findings replicate international studies, in identifying the complex and contested nature of sustainability as a barrier to teaching, but also identify context-specific issues such as the lack of reliable data and the political ramifications of speaking about controversial topics.  

Using Chinese Traditional Crosstalk in Academic Development: the Case of Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China

Room: Oakwood A
Wenting Xing
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Teaching & Learning Crosstalk Program (TLCTP) originated in 2014 by CTLD of SJTU, which has been playing very important role in Academic Development on campus. The creation of TLCTP is tailor-made based on the survey. The theme and content is derived from the real teaching and learning environment and culture. With comic, ironical and exaggerated performance, as well as interactive discussion, TLCTP reveals teaching problems from students' view in vivid and effective way and leads faculty to reflecting and improving their teaching practice. In this presentation, we will introduce this creative program and share 4 years’ experience as well as show the audience feedbacks and a video of TLCTP performances.

An Analysis of Students' Evaluation of Teaching in Chinese Research University: Take the research of undergraduate in Xiamen University as an example

Room: Conference Center
Yanan CUI, Wei WU
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
To improve the quality of teachers' teaching in research universities and help teachers diagnose their teaching effects, the study used the questionnaire to do the research on satisfaction of the courses and teachers. Through statistical analysis of data, the following conclusions are drawn: The student's overall satisfaction with the quality of courses and teachers is “good”; Students' satisfaction of teachers’ attitude is higher than teaching ability; There are different degrees of correlation between teacher elements, course elements and assessment scores; Teachers who mainly train postgraduate students are generally got lower scores than those train undergraduates. According to the research results, researchers proposed effective suggestions to improve teachers' behavior and quality for research universities.    

Finding a voice through writing instruction faculty development

Room: Dunwoody C
Andrea Phillipson
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Proficiency in written communication is a common undergraduate degree level expectation, yet many Canadian institutions leave writing instruction up to individual instructors. This presentation describes efforts to address this gap with a pilot program in one department at a medium-sized Canadian university. The program included faculty development in writing instruction modelled on Cranton’s (1996) and Cranton and King’s (2003) suggestions for prioritizing transformative learning for educators. This study traces one instructor who experienced transformative change, not only finding his own voice for teaching writing, but also discovering that explicit writing instruction helps the most disadvantaged students find their voices.  

Developing the next generation of university teachers

Room: Maplewood B
Amanda Hlengwa
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP) is a systemic mechanism implemented in South Africa’s public universities, designed to respond to the challenges related to composition and capacity of academic staff to adequately respond to the competing demands placed on higher education. These early-career appointees are completely new to formal academic teaching. This paper examines the extent to which existing induction programmes in four institutions align with the aims of ‘transforming’ the academy. Questions arise regarding the development of nGAP appointees as teachers that contribute to institutional changes in pedagogical approaches and to curriculum development more generally.

What is effective teaching: What is effective teaching from the perception of international students at a top Chinese university?

Room: Oakwood B
Yan Ding
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
China has become one of the biggest hosts for international students in the world. However, the dominant reason for attracting them is not the teaching reputation of Chinese universities. This study attempts to highlight what good teaching and poor teaching that international students have experienced at a top Chinese university through interview. The findings show that international students expect inter-cultural interactions, teachers' caring, good preparation for teaching and effective feedback etc. It is necessary for Chinese university teachers to improve their global awareness, intercultural/multicultural teaching competence in order to better meet the learning needs of international students.

Empowering students

Room: Camellia
Sonja Rapp, Lena Fliegl
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
The European Bologna Process has changed many study programs into subject-specific and heavily structured trainings. Nevertheless, students have ideas, visions and the willingness to participate in and actively shape university and society. It is one goal of the Centre for Higher Education and Lifelong Learning at the University of Stuttgart to empower students by supporting them to develop their own voice and personality and in creating formats for students to engage in. They are given the opportunity to influence the curriculum, and to provide own ideas for topics. Besides specific subject knowledge students apply their competencies as a responsible citizen.  

Conflict Coaching in Educational Development: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Difficult Consultations and Beyond

Room: Dunwoody A
Esther Jordan
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper extends Little and Palmer’s Coaching Framework (2012) and Jones and Brinkert’s Conflict Coaching Framework (2008) to construct an interdisciplinary model for conflict coaching in educational development contexts, from consultations to workshop facilitation. It examines the efficacy of the model through qualitative research based on the results of longitudinal surveys of faculty and educational developers who have used the model to manage conflicts in higher education settings. Based on the results of the study, it makes recommendations for improvements to the model for future use.  

Cross-disciplinary collaboration and participatory design of learning spaces as a driving force for organizational change

Room: Gardenia
Marie Leijon, Patricia Staaf
Session Track: Organizational Development
Can learning spaces in higher education be designed in an iterative participatory process where students, teachers, architects, educational developers and researchers work together as change agents? The paper presents results from a participatory design project on learning spaces at Malmo University, Sweden. In a participatory design perspective, users are experts and active in the design process, aiming to drive collaboration and contribute to an agency. The paper discusses how to build a sustainable participatory process framed within a pedagogical perspective, and shares ideas on how the development of learning spaces benefits from a cross-disciplinary organization within the university.

Improving skill competence and research outcomes in China through BIOS, an authentic research experience

Room: Oakwood A
Justin Fendos, Liang Cai
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
In STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) education, a contemporary issue is the development of effective skill training. In China, the need for skill competence is accentuated by the fact that most published research is conducted by students. Applying principles from active learning and scientific teaching, this paper describes the development of the BIOS program, an authentic research experience for undergraduates we have employed with great success to improve learning gains, student satisfaction, and preparedness for independent research. The structure of BIOS is a useful model applicable to other academic disciplines requiring improvements in skill competence or student research outcome.

Efficient Strategies for Showing Evidence of Student Learning Outcomes

Room: Conference Center
Linda Haynes
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Although teaching and helping others develop professionally is quite rewarding, showing evidence of student learning outcomes can be quite arduous. When educators have a thorough assessment plan and easy-to-use web-based assessments, assessing student learning outcomes can be done more efficiently and can make teaching much more rewarding. Efficient strategies for learning assessment will enable instructors to show evidence of student learning outcomes more effectively. In this session, participants will plan and create assessments with easy-to-use web-based tools for rubrics, student response systems, quizzes, and concept maps. Participants should bring mobile devices so they can be actively engaged in learning.

Why Isn’t Everyone Jumping on the Bandwagon? Success and Failure of Teaching and Learning Technologies

Room: Dunwoody C
Nitza Davidovitch
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
This paper explores the challenges of and resistance to adoption of blended teaching strategies for institutions of higher learning.  We review research literature on the effectiveness of introducing new technologies in higher education, and elaborate on the unique features of blended teaching and teachers’ responses to efforts to introduce technology in Israeli institutions of higher education. We discuss whether the term “blended learning” creates a false sense of technological progress and effectiveness, and how educators may be confusing technology’s role as a means rather than as an end.    

Global versus Regional Identity? – Helping Students to Feel at Home and Look at Academic Challenges from a Global Perspective

Room: Maplewood A
Martina Moerth, Claudia Burger, Bjoern Kiehne
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
In Europe, nationalism is on the rise again. After 75 years of peace, regional identities are becoming stronger. Against this background, higher education is facing the question of how students can best develop an open-minded attitude towards global questions. Accordingly, faculty development programs must consider both teaching conditions and responsibilities with regard to study organization, teaching skills, and general attitudes towards teaching and learning. The paper presents the Berlin Certificate of Teaching Internationally that has recently been designed and implemented in response to these questions, and it discusses them under the umbrella term of diversity-sensitive teaching.  

The conception of “the good teacher” portrayed in organisational evaluation tools at the University of Iceland

Room: Oakwood B
Gudrun Geirsdottir
Session Track: Organizational Development
Despite the lack of common quality criteria for teaching at the University of Iceland teachers’ performance in teaching within the University is evaluated by different tools. From a social theory perspective those tools are a part of the structure academics are socialized into. Using a discourse analysis, the most influential evaluations tools of the organisation were analysed to explore the concept of “the good teacher” and their practices. Preliminary findings indicate a narrow, technical view of teaching practices that neither take into account SoTL ideas nor focus on professional development. The findings will be discussed in the light of constrains of dominant research discourses on academics identities.

How teaching obstructs student preparation

Room: Camellia
Eva Ulstrup
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Research shows that students often turn up inadequately prepared to participate in courses. It also shows that teachers unintentionally create and reinforce this tendency which is aggravated by organizational structures. This paper will discuss this phenomenon drawing on international research as well as findings from my PhD project at Roskilde University (RUC), Denmark. Through active course observation and interviews with students and teachers, I am currently investigating correlations and discrepancies between teachers’ and students’ attitudes and experiences related to university teaching and learning. One of the most striking discrepancies is related to student preparation. I argue that the inconsistency between teachers’ intentional and actual behavior can be a serious obstacle to the development of desirable student culture.

Academic developers as drivers of change: Centering voices for learning

Room: Dunwoody A
Keisha Valdez
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Within many higher education institutions, Western perspectives guide how knowledge is produced and shared. Curriculum transformation can potentially create a more balanced worldview or a centering of more voices. Online and Blended Learning has been lauded as offering possibilities for transformation. Academic Developers are poised to play a critical role in positioning OBL as a strategic point for change.  Drawing on perspectives on curriculum decolonising and on instructional design frameworks, this session engages participants in an interrogation of the role of Academic Developers in stimulating/supporting transformation through re-visioning the application of alternative design frameworks to online and blended learning.  

Learning Environments in Change: Case UEF

Room: Gardenia
Tommi Haapaniemi, Tuula Heide
Session Track: Organizational Development
In the recent years, universities have focused strongly on the development of learning environments. The University of Eastern Finland has set the development of learning environments as one of its most important strategic goals. For the development, four cornerstones have been identified: Learning and teaching, Staff competencies, Technological learning environment and Teaching and learning facilities. The recent experiences and outcomes of the development of learning environments will be elaborated and discussed in order to discover new solutions and ways to harness the changing environments and new technologies.  

Developing Faculty Identity through the Principle of Partnership

Room: Maplewood B
Mary Carney
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
In the January 2018 To Improve the Academy, Peter Felton and Nancy Chick pose the question “Is SoTL a Signature Pedagogy of Educational Development?” They outline the parallels between Felton’s five principles of good practice in SoTL with the “activities, practices, or habits of hand” of educational developers. The fourth of the principles is “conducted in partnership” wherein “faculty colleagues have the ‘right to set objectives and make decisions.’” This paper will explore the ways in which year-long faculty academies in teaching and SoTL offered at the University of North Georgia are structured to support faculty identity and continuous inquiry.      

Measuring impact: Learning gain on taught programmes in learning and teaching at university

Room: Conference Center
Antony Aleksiev, Carole Davis
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Measuring impact empowers educational developers in evidencing the outcomes and value of our work. Here we discuss the impact of taught programmes in university learning and teaching on the developing practices of participants. We have adapted an existing self-evaluative tool to measure the learning gain of participants on three such programmes at Queen Mary University of London, UK. Participants answered questions designed to measure the degree to which they feel capable of meeting the learning outcomes of the first module of the programmes. We present the results on individual and group learning gain against participants’ performance in the module assessment.  

Walking the tightrope: defending academic authority and identities and remaining relevant in an institutional strategic project.

Room: Dunwoody B
Rhonda Hallett
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
A team of academic developers engaged in a strategic project aimed at reforming the undergraduate curriculum in an Australian institution over 3 years (2015-17) through a progressive process of digitising the teaching and learning experiences in ‘blended’ units of study. This paper reports outcomes from an ethnographic study investigating the increasing influence of managerialist discourses on their practices and identities during this period. Findings indicate that academic developers in the project team created spaces to exercise principled agency and autonomy despite the pressure for performativity and growing surveillance from a project management team appointed to monitor and report project outcomes.  

A Comparison of Priorities, Services, and Approaches to Educational Development in Japan and the U.S.

Room: Maplewood A
Toru Hayashi, Shinichi Yamazaki, Masa Fukano, Andrea Beach, Mary Deane Sorcinelli
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Educational development is expanding worldwide, as evidenced by the vibrancy of ICED.   Globally, there is considerable interest in improving teaching quality and student success, and in the educational development practices that supports these goals. At the same time, comparative research on faculty professional development across international boundaries is rare.  This session focuses on findings of two identical national surveys of educational developers in Japan and the U.S.  We will discuss similarities and differences, propose next steps in the agendas for change in each country, and consider opportunities for cross-cultural international collaboration to support further development of our field.

Exploring the learning opportunities of an innovative teaching method in a constructivist classroom environment

Room: Oakwood A
Salome Smit
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Student-centred teaching strategies were adopted to align with institutional transformations. The aim was to explore the opportunities of an innovative teaching method, within a constructivist classroom environment. Students construct knowledge and meaning from their experiences during the learning activity by constructing a basic 3D model from modelling material, according to their prior knowledge of the normal anatomy of the structure. The student then trace the progression of changes instigated by the disease by changing the model according to the stages as the disease progresses, until the end stage of the disease. Evidence confirmed the effectiveness of the learning activity.  

Anti-oppressive educational development through the backdoor: Exploring hot moments and microaggressions in the face of unrelenting normative whiteness

Room: Dunwoody A
Yael Harlap
Session Track: Diversity
How do educational developers address difference, power and social justice in educational contexts where these are not perceived as important or relevant? Might our strategies and approaches have something to offer, also to places where these issues are front and center? This paper explores a course on "Hot Moments in Teaching and Learning" as a backdoor approach to bringing content on anti-oppressive teaching to faculty at a Norwegian university, where the only identity category broadly recognized as relevant to higher education is gender. I share key strategies and concepts that foster faculty members' motivation to increase their awareness and competence.  

Space Matters: Designing Classrooms for Change

Room: Gardenia
Michael Goudzwaard, Cynthia Cogswell
Session Track: Organizational Development
Faculty developers, instructional designers, and classroom technologists often work together yet are siloed within different units at institutions. How do differences in roles and reporting help or hinder the shared work of improving student learning and learning spaces? How might Design Thinking and applying an instrument such as the Learning Spaces Rating System assess our learning environments and advocate for institutional change? Join us for this interactive workshop exploring how campuses can best work together with pedagogy, technology, and assessment to support teaching and learning on our campuses through classroom design.

Academic development for junior faculty: results from an Italian experience at Politecnico di Torino

Room: Maplewood B
Anna Serbati, Ettore Felisatti, Anita Tabacco, Lorenza Da Re
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper presents results from a professional development program for new faculty at Politecnico di Torino (Italy). Constructivist theories and learner-centered teaching constituted the theoretical framework of this study. The training activity involved a group of 121 junior faculty. Researchers investigated program impacts on faculty’s professional reflection and on their practice in class, as well as participants’ satisfaction, using a mixed-methods approach. Participants took the Teaching Perspective Inventory before and after the program. Paired sample t-test on TPI results showed significant differences in 4 pespectives out of 5. Group discussion reflected on how these perspectives changed and investigated future impacts.  

Student Voices Uncovered in the History Survey and Faculty Voices Amplified by a Department Liaison Program

Room: Camellia
Carla Vecchiola
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
This presentation describes the results of moving an American History Survey course from a face-to-face class with a textbook to an online class with open educational resources. I will demonstrate how a student-centered approach utilizing direct access to primary sources created a culture of engagement and deliberative discussion. Students applied their critical evaluation skills not just to historical materials but also to contemporary sources. Our teaching center takes a similar faculty-to-faculty approach to disseminating best teaching practices. Participants will leave with a model for a program that might increase faculty voice on their campuses.

Jumping the S-Curve: A Systems Thinking Toolkit for Educational Developers

Room: Dunwoody B
Laura Cruz, Amy Chan-Hilton
Session Track: Organizational Development
In this interactive session, we will explore the critical components of systems thinking, with particular attention to the question of how the critical adaptation of the tools of systems analysis (including systems mapping, S-curves, organizational learning, and design thinking) can enhance the impact of the work we do as educational developers, both within an institution and across the field. 

Bridging Perspectives: A Strategic Approach for the Internationalisation of Curricula through Graduate Attributes

Room: Maplewood A
Catherine Meissner, Winny Bakker
Session Track: Organizational Development
This paper describes a strategic approach for the internationalisation of education which involves aligning institutional and disciplinary perspectives, through a focus on graduate attributes. Generic graduate attributes are transferred into specific graduate profiles for degree programs. These graduate profiles make internationalisation explicit in the context of a discipline and provide guidance for interventions towards an internationalised curriculum. Based on Barrie (2007), the case of a study program at the University of Groningen (NL) shows that this approach can lead to shared and well-defined rationales for internationalisation in the context of a specific discipline and, subsequently, enables the allocation of tailor-made support activities.

Rites of Passage Re-Visited

Room: Oakwood A
Christel Brost
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
This paper analyzes what happens when you introduce the concept of liminality to students, drawing upon their spoken and written accounts of their experience. I will discuss the educational significance of introducing them to the concept of liminality as a way to understand their own insecurities and disorientation. The emotional reflections by students, on being betwixed and between will give voice to the experience of a liminal period. There is a threshold concept to consider when students enter HE. The theoretical framework stems from van Gennep, Turner and Thomassen and the transfer from anthropology and sociology to education credited Cook-Sather.  

Re-conceptualizing the Assessment of Teaching in Higher Education

Room: Conference Center
Arshad Ahmad, Robert Cassidy, Torgny Roxå, Janette Barrington, John VanMaaren
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Research on student evaluation of teaching (SET) suggests that, as a primary evaluation mechanism, it is biased and suffers from validity and reliability issues undermining its use to enhance teaching. This has led some universities to rethink the role of SETs in assessing and promoting effective teaching. Given different institutional contexts and priorities, we propose a systems-based model (SBM) that can be used to derive the assessment of teaching based on a variety of stakeholder needs. The SBM is grounded in theoretical approaches to teaching, professional learning, and organizational change with case studies depicting a variety of university contexts.  

Online collaborative learning across borders in the Open Networked Learning course.

Room: Dunwoody C
Lars Uhlin
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Open Networked Learning (ONL) is an open online course developed in collaboration between educational developers at different institutions. ONL is offered as a course for teachers at partner universities and for open learners from different countries. It provides opportunities for teachers to learn about, experience and reflect on what collaborative networked learning can mean for their own teaching practice and context. The design places learners in heterogeneous online problem-based learning groups, thus creating interdisciplinary and multicultural groups. Experience from seven course iterations and results from evaluations and a recent study on participant’s perceptions of how the ONL design supports online learning and collaboration will be presented and discussed.

Effective Teaching Practices, a Workshop for “good” Teaching

Room: Maplewood B
Deborah Walker
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Please enter your session abstract here (max 100 words).  The abstract will be published in the conference program if your proposal is accepted.  Students frequently cite poor teaching as a reason for leaving a STEM major. To remedy this situation, our center custom designed a workshop series for new faculty in the College of Engineering & Computing. This presentation will guide participants through the design and development process of a faculty development series addressing quality teaching to improve student retention. Participants will have the opportunity to draft a workshop agenda applicable to their university context.  While this workshop was custom designed for a STEM college, the design, content and teaching strategies incorporated apply to any discipline interested in “good” teaching.

Building a Culture of Academic Integrity: Faculty Engagement, Beliefs, and Perceptions

Room: Oakwood B
Cristi Ford, Douglas Harrison, Laura Harris
Session Track: Organizational Development
The literature and practice of academic integrity consistently affirm that the ways to achieve meaningful educational experiences align with the most effective strategies to ensure the integrity of teaching and learning. Understanding the perceptions and beliefs that faculty and staff hold around academic integrity - and the related behaviors and actions - is essential for institutional efforts to infuse an emphasis on integrity across the curriculum and to develop academic integrity policies and processes that emphasize student success. This paper presents a qualitative content analysis of faculty and staff perceptions and beliefs about academic integrity as part of a comprehensive initiative at Access University to define an institutional vision and a set of strategies to enhance and maintain a culture of academic integrity.

A Motivation Inventory - A Tool for Teachers´ Action Research

Room: Camellia
Dr. Asta B Schram
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Faculty development programs might aid teachers in action research by providing them with tools to reflect on their teaching. The MUSIC Model of Academic Motivation Inventory will be introduced, a tool that teachers use to assess student motivation, aiming at modifying their teaching accordingly. The inventory has been validated in several fields and age groups. It is based on the MUSIC Model of Motivation (Jones, 2017), a model developed after extensive study of motivation research and theories. The acronym describes five classroom factors that are strongly related to motivation, M: eMpowerment, U: Usefulness, S: Success, I: Interest and C: Caring.  

Adopt, Adapt, and Apply a Quality Assurance Framework to Drive Institutional Change

Room: Dunwoody B
Yaping Gao
Session Track: Organizational Development
Developing a sustainable quality assurance process and implementing strategies systematically to achieve desired outcomes in online/distance education or blended learning can be challenging because there are many factors to consider and many obstacles to overcome. The “Continuum of Excellence” (CoE) Framework has been developed to guide institutions in reaching their strategic goals. This session introduces a research-supported quality assurance process and the CoE Framework, developed by a leading US-based international quality assurance organization with over 1100  member institutions worldwide, that helps participants determine their institution’s current practices and what steps to takes to reach the next stage, and how to adapt and apply the research-supported quality assurance process and framework for their institutional change.
11:15am to 12:45pm
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Keynote Session: Institutional Change: Voices, Identities, Power, and Outcomes

Room: Ravinia Ballroom
Mary Deane Sorcinelli, Torgny Roxå, Chng Huang Hoon, Joy Mighty, Michele DiPietro
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Join us for a thought-provoking conversation with our keynote panelists! Drs. Chng Huang Hoon, Joy Mighty, Torgny Roxå, and Mary Deane Sorcinelli will help us unpack the conference theme and probe the narratives we hold about ourselves and our field. When we say we are change agents, whose agenda are we really enacting? As we navigate an ideological world with unequal power relations, which voices are foregrounded? As we triangulate multiple international perspectives, paradoxes and complexity emerge, creating an exciting framework for the rest of the conference! Read the panelists' think pieces here
12:45pm to 1:45pm
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Lunch. Let's Eat!

Room: Ravinia Ballroom
Lunch is included with your registration. 
2:00pm to 3:00pm
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Screencasting for Student Learning and Assessment

Room: Dunwoody B
Douglas Harvey
Session Track: Technology
This workshop will provide the attendees with a new perspective on the use of screencasting technology for improving student learning and assessment of learning outcomes. The workshop facilitators will model how they are using student-created screencasts as a strategy for engaging learners with course content, both individually and in collaborative groups. Special attention will be given to methods for assessing screencasts to measure student learning. Attendees will be guided through the process of creating screencasts, and develop assignments and assessments for use in their own teaching.

Supporting Effective Mentors of Undergraduate Research: The Importance of Structured Preparation and Training

Room: Maplewood B
Sarah Macdonald, Beatriz Brando
Session Track: Graduate Student Professional Development
How can institutions support the development of research mentoring skills for faculty and future faculty? This session will present resources from a research mentoring toolkit and research findings from an NSF-funded study of a graduate/undergraduate research mentoring program to demonstrate the importance of training future faculty in how to mentor undergraduates in research. Workshop participants will engage in conversation about how to best support faculty and future faculty as research mentors. Participants will identify how research mentoring skills are developed on their campuses, share their experiences, and develop a plan for increasing support for research mentoring at their institutions.

Measuring Transparency: A Learning-Focused Assignment Rubric

Room: Dunwoody A
Michael Palmer
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
By combining recommendations for effective assignment design with principles of transparency in learning and teaching and the value-expectancy theory of achievement motivation, we have developed a rubric capable of assessing the quality of and guiding the design of assignments. The rubric defines broad criteria characteristic of well-designed assignments; breaks the criteria down into a set of concrete, measurable components; and suggests what evidence for each component might look like. While valid for major, signature assignments, it is flexible enough to accommodate a diverse range of levels, disciplines, institutions, and learning environments yet nuanced enough to provide summative information to educational developers using the tool for research purposes and formative feedback to instructors interested in gauging the quality and focus of their assignments.  

Understanding the Need for Supporting Culturally Responsive Faculty

Room: Maplewood A
China Jenkins
Session Track: Diversity
As the student populations of predominately White institutions of higher education around the world progressively diversify, there is a growing need for educators to establish inclusive academic environments.  Educators can create inclusive classrooms through the adoption of a culturally responsive pedagogy.  Many educators become culturally responsive to effectively instruct and mentor learners from other cultures; however, they often become frustrated without proper support from others, including educational developers.  This workshop will help educational developers understand the needs of culturally responsive professors, as well as generate ideas on how they may provide such educators with support and professional development.

Valuing different voices: Strategies for enacting pedagogical partnerships in diverse contexts

Room: Conference Center
Cherie Woolmer, Peter Felten, Kathrin Glaeser, Alison Cook-Sather
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Pedagogical partnerships challenge traditional roles and boundaries within higher education by bringing together diverse experiences, knowledges, and voices of faculty and students. In this panel, four developers who facilitate and research faculty-student partnerships in different contexts discuss the dissonance between partnership practice and context, including national politics, institutional cultures, and language, which influence how partnership is interpreted and enacted. Attendees will have opportunity to reflect upon how the struggles experienced in different contexts are highlighted and mitigated through the actions and agency of those practicing partnership — and of developers who advocate for and support partnerships.

Student Engagement: A Multidimensional Perspective

Room: Gardenia
James Groccia
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The concept of student engagement has played an increasingly significant role in efforts to understand and improve university student learning and persistence as well as overall institutional quality. I will present a multidimensional model that expands the definition and application of student engagement in higher education and discusses the increasingly important need for engaging today’s university student. The impact of student engagement in learning, teaching and research as well as with faculty, community and other students is explored and suggestions are provided as to how the entire academic community can support these activities.

Amplifying Voices and Marginalized Identities: Strengths and Weaknesses of Identity Group Programming

Room: Camellia
Laurie Maynell, Jessica Riviere
Session Track: Diversity
When we design programming to appeal to a particular subset of the campus population, it is with the intent to provide targeted support to a group that may otherwise be marginalized. Ideally, academic developers’ liminal position within the university administration affords access to larger campus initiatives, potentially serving as spokespeople for the less powerful. How can we plan programming that does not reinforce the marginalization of underrepresented populations? Participants will reflect on their own professional identity, connections that identity might open to them, and ways to leverage connections to shift institutional culture towards more equitable teaching and working conditions.

Faculty Collaboration for Integrative Learning

Room: Oakwood B
Hillary Steiner
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Integrative learning--connecting ideas and transferring learning to new and complex situations--is an essential learning outcome for undergraduates (AAC&U, 2007). It is also central to the high-impact practice of student learning communities, where faculty are challenged to move beyond their disciplinary perspectives to collaborate in creating interdisciplinary learning experiences. Educational developers can help faculty design these experiences by providing practical, targeted professional development opportunities. Participants in this interactive workshop will learn about and engage in one such activity that is designed to help faculty collaborate to promote integrative learning within learning communities.

A New Doctoral Mentor Development Framework: Tools for Faculty Development

Room: Dunwoody C
Curtis Brant, Ying Iverson
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Please join us for a session that will offer professionals a model to support doctoral mentor development. In this interactive session, the time-honored tradition of doctoral mentoring will be explored through a new lens of analytics and a supportive ecosystem. Members of Capella University will share their efforts to re-imagine the role, expectations, and support structure for doctoral mentors. Using a specific case study, the presentation will offer participants a deeper understanding of how to conceptualize efforts to support mentor development by aligning behavioral expectations with mentor performance data, and existing support resources. 

Looking Externally to Evolve Internally: A Centre Survey

Room: Oakwood A
Jessica Raffoul, Allyson Skene, Erika Kustra, Pierre Boulos
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Changing roles and expectations have led to increasing pressures for teaching and learning centres to assess their impact (Hines, 2017). While workshop attendance and satisfaction ratings provide preliminary data, garnering stakeholders’ deeper and richer insights through narrative and perceptions can enrich centre and institutional priorities development and decisions (Grabove et al., 2012).  This session will share results from a centre survey and review, exploring diverse perceptions of the unit’s value, effectiveness of its events and programs, barriers to participation, and notable practices and ideas. Session participants will analyze trends, discuss applications in their own contexts, and critique methodology.
3:15pm to 4:15pm
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Low Budget, No Team. How to develop your educational institution against the odds

Room: Oakwood B
Bernhard Lange
Session Track: Organizational Development
Many faculty developers are in a tight spot as far as their means for change are concerned. Ideas and motivation in abundance, they are restricted by the general setting of their work place. In this workshop, we will collaborate to beat the odds. You will first analyze your individual work place situation at your institution, identify key topics, and then proceed to discuss in teams the most promising areas for optimization. The goal of the workshop is a collection of actionable ideas and practical guidelines to enable you to realize your projects. Bring your laptop!  

Evolution of a Multi-Cultural Research University in Greater China

Room: Dunwoody C
Katrine Wong, Zihao Li, Spencer BENSON
Session Track: Organizational Development
The University of Macau (UM), an English-medium Asian University, has undergone major institutional changes in the past decade. UM has quickly evolved from a primarily teaching university to an international research university, instituted and revamped a GE programme, established the Centre for Teaching and Learning Enhancement (CTLE) that promotes faculty development, learner-centred education and blended learning, and established Asia’s largest residential college system and a prestigious university-wide teaching excellence award that foregrounds teaching alongside research and multi-lingual education. The panel speakers – academic and administrative voices involved in these changes – will discuss how these changes impact their identities as faculty members.

Student Panels Help Faculty Support Diverse Students

Room: Oakwood A
Tonya Whitehead, Sara Kacin
Session Track: Diversity
Are you interested in the best ways to support your underrepresented and non-traditional students? Why not ask them directly? Veterans, LGBTQ+ students, and students with disabilities have unique needs that faculty may not have considered. This session will discuss preparing to host student lead panels. These panels are designed to give the students the opportunity to share what is most beneficial to them directly with faculty. Hearing personal stories for students more powerfully connects with faculty and leads to positive changes in the classroom to improve student learning.

Mapping academic development in an era of HE change

Room: Dunwoody B
Klara Bolander Laksov, Chng Huang Hoon
Session Track: Organizational Development
Five years have passed since Gibbs' seminal work on the changing nature of educational development. Although many of the categorisations may still be valid, we acknowledge that academic development practice is in constant negotiation with the environment in which it takes place. The purpose of this workshop is to map understandings of academic development in different contexts. Together we will map our understandings of academic development into a heuristic. creating focal points for research and development of academic development practice.  

Towards a network approach of educational development

Room: Maplewood B
Ine Rens, Rebecca Resseler
Session Track: Organizational Development
As educational developers we often face changing policies, challenging us to question who we are and what we (should) do. In the upcoming years our university wants to invest in ‘future-oriented education’, a large-scale project aiming at introducing active learning university-wide. Educational support at a micro-level for all faculty members is needed. A need our Educational Development Unit (EDU) cannot fulfill. Instead of investing in another reorganization of our EDU, we concentrate on ‘working smarter’ and 'network thinking'. What is our added value, what role do central and local developers need to play? Find out together with us.

Navigating the Margins: An Intersectional Approach to Understanding Identity and Power in Educational Development

Room: Camellia
Kathryn Plank
Session Track: Organizational Development
The role of educational developers has been repeatedly described as marginal and precarious, and yet we also can be seen as agents of change and instruments of institutional power. This workshop uses the lens of intersectional theory to better understand the constantly shifting boundaries of identity and power inherent in the liminal space we occupy in academia.  Through a series of case studies, reflective writing activities, group discussion, and excerpts from the scholarly literature, we will to explore the intersections of power and marginalization and what it means for our work in educational development.    

Inclusive Pedagogy in Higher Ed

Room: Maplewood A
Bryan Dewsbury, Andrew Koch
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The diversification of college classrooms and unequal academic outcomes between different socioeconomic groups of students requires a critical examination of the learning environment. Part of this examination includes faculty teaching practices. Pedagogical transformation requires providing support for practitioners who may not have previously considered the fundamental concepts of inclusion in their practice. Our workshop makes the case for inclusive teaching practice. We introduce participants to the fundamentals of inclusive pedagogy, and, demonstrate ways in which they can be implemented and assessed. We envision this workshop as an opportunity for participants to continue their career-long commitment to developing inclusive classrooms.    

Measuring Impact for Educational Developers - Towards a New Framework?

Room: Gardenia
Fiona Denney, Carole Davis, Susannah Quinsee, Sara Reimers
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
This workshop aims to develop the measurement of educational development activities in a meaningful way.  Educational development units (EDUs) have increasingly been required to demonstrate value for money through evidence of impact.  Approaches frequently involve metrics and rarely meaningfully capture the transformational nature of much educational development activity.  In this workshop, participants will evaluate and discuss results of a recent survey of British and Australian universities which identify the range of frameworks and measures that are being used.  Participants will then draft a framework to be piloted by EDUs for the generation of more meaningful evidence of impact.  
4:30pm to 5:30pm
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Publishing on educational development: A conversation with IJAD editors

Room: Oakwood B
Peter Felten, Kathryn Sutherland, Johan Geertsema, Chng Huang Hoon, Roeland van der Rijst, Suzanne Le-May Sheffield, Meegan Hall, Klara Bolander Laksov
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Are you interested in publishing on educational development? This panel of editors from the International Journal for Academic Development, ICED’s journal, will answer your questions about writing, researching, reviewing, and publishing in the field. We will focus in particular on how to make your work appropriate for and appealing to an international audience. The session is designed for everyone, including those who are new to, or experienced in, writing about educational development.

Workshop in Collegial intervision - teacher development through peer observation of teaching and action learning, communities of practice

Room: Dunwoody C
Sidsel Winther
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Collegial intervision (CI) is a teacher development programme at Roskilde University. CI is based on observation of teaching followed by a reflective dialogue in groups of three colleagues. In the CI process, the teachers’ become aware of the dominating discourses in the educational processes. This has a potentially great impact on their identity development thus also an institutional change. The process can be structured differently, which affects the power between the participants hence the reflection process. The intended outcomes for the workshop participants are gaining basic knowledge about CI, its implications and practical experience in how to utilize it.  

‘The Development Dilemma': Using Mezirow to transform professional identity and impact organizational change.

Room: Oakwood A
Martyn Kingsbury, Jo Horsburgh, Kate Ippolito
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
As educational developers we are aware of the challenges in changing not just superficial practice but transforming individuals’ professional identity, such that it can facilitate sustainable organisational change in pedagogic practice.  We will use this workshop to facilitate a critically reflective dialogue on how teacher identity development, particularly of 'critical' individuals, may be important in this process.  We will draw on Mezirow’s (1991) concepts of frames of reference and disorientating dilemmas, as well as empirical data collected through our Master’s in Education case study, to consider transformative learning both from the perspective of individual and institution.  

Voices of power - Institutional investigations for change

Room: Dunwoody B
Mona Fjellstrom
Session Track: Organizational Development
The purpose of this session is to discuss research strategies in a study of HE institutional investigations aiming at changes in academic development units. The study is still in an initial phase mainly with a research idea and number of documented HE institutional investigations. During the session, I would like to discuss possible research questions, methods and validation strategies. As a start, I will present the material for the study and my initial ideas.    

Who We Are Counts: Inserting our Personal and Professionals Selves in Organisational Spaces

Room: Maplewood B
Vanessa-Jean Merckel James, Kasturi Behari-Leak, Esmarie Strydom, Kershree Padayachee, Rieta Ganas, Langutani Mary Masehela, Bradley Rink
Session Track: Organizational Development
Who we are in professional organisations is directly influenced by our personal and professional identities. Organisational identities are shaped by our biographies and geographies, which influence  our values, beliefs and aspirations, and our motivation and commitment to organisational development. In this panel session, members of the HELTASA executive committee reflect critically on the outcomes of a participatory learning and action process in which we explored our constructions of our individual, relational, professional and organisational selves. We share insights on how our multiple identities influence our organisational work and how we exercise agency in fulfilling our commitments in higher education.  

Listening to Alternative Faculty Voices: A Counter-Storytelling Approach

Room: Dunwoody A
Cynthia Ganote
Session Track: Diversity
Often in our educational development work, we need to gather multiple faculty perspectives (e.g. “What are faculty needs around x?”). However, it is often easiest to listen to faculty voices that are the loudest, the most accessible, or the most familiar to us. Counter-storytelling, “a method of telling the stories of those people whose experiences are not often told” (Solorzano and Yosso, 2002:26), allows us to listen to faculty members who have the most experience in our institutions with racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, classism, and American imperialism. Upon hearing these perspectives, we can move beyond dominant narratives in our institutions.  

Using Student Perception Research to Inform Educational Development Work

Room: Maplewood A
Riley Caldwell-OKeefe
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Participants will engage with research about student learning preferences in order to understand student perception of teaching strategies within a given context.  The study, conducted by the presenter, examined the preferred learning methods of the undergraduate international student population utilized in first-year seminars at a large, four-year, primarily non-residential research university in the United States. We will discuss the methodologies and findings, including strategies that students found “most helpful” for their learning.  Participants will then develop a plan for their own student-centered research that will inform their work with faculty. We will ground our discussion in research about inclusive pedagogies.

Going back to the future - Exploring the Link Between Learning Biography and Teaching Conceptions

Room: Camellia
Bjoern Kiehne
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
How did our learning experiences shaped our conceptions of teaching? In this workshop we go back in time in order to understand ourselves better. Based on my research on the teaching conceptions of early career academics (Kiehne, 2015) I will introduce you to a set of methods that help to include the learning biography into the process of teaching skill development for researchers.

Using Strategic Planning to Evaluate Academic Development Units

Room: Gardenia
Angela Linse
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
"How do we evaluate the effectiveness of Academic Development Units?" (ADUs) is a perennial question in the field. The typical approach is a mélange of distinct assessments of services and programs offered by ADUs. This session explores how a well-designed strategic plan can guide holistic ADU evaluation.  Strategic plans include clear vision and mission statements and explicit goals for what an ADU wants to achieve in future. Participants will discuss academic development assessment, strategic planning, develop streamlined vision and mission statements, and results that matter to unit constituencies, develop or rewrite at least one achievable goal.  
7:00pm to 8:30pm
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Opening Dinner

Room: Ravinia Ballroom
Lets Eat!