Schedule

You may download the full conference program here: 2018 ICED Program

8:00am to 9:30am
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Curriculum development and meso level change: evaluating a single institution change academy

Room: Dunwoody C
Nancy Turner, Mick Healey, Ryan Banow, Giselle Patrick
Session Track: Organizational Development
Strategic initiatives to design and implement curricular change in HE have received increasing attention in recent years (Barnett & Coate, 2005; Blackmore & Kandico, 2012).  This session considers one approach to supporting collaborative curricular change by program teams, including students, within one Canadian HEI. Grounded in theories of meso-level change (e.g. Gherardi, 2012; Knight & Trowler, 2000) and scholarship related to curriculum design (e.g. Wolf, 2007) the approach builds on cross institutional change academy models (Bradford, 2009; Healey, et al, 2013).  The session will explore the application of this model in one institution, including its theoretical groundings and outcomes.

Professional Recognition – Giving teaching and supporting learning a professional identity

Room: Maplewood B
Fiona Smart
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Higher Education Academy fellowships have been around since 2006, prior to that they were awarded through ILTHE.  But in recent years there has been a growth, globally. This paper will explore the impact professional recognition through HEA Fellowships on the individuals who have engaged in reflection on their practice. HEA Fellowships accommodate a broad spectrum of staff who are involved in supporting learning in higher education. Professional recognition extends beyond academic staff, and includes technicians, patients involved in health related courses, student support, library staff, research supervisors and senior university leaders.  The personal drivers to engage go beyond the award of post nominals and institutional directives.  

It's not third time lucky: Reflective Practice on a Faculty Development Project towards students learning and reflective teaching in higher education

Room: Oakwood B
Aline von Bahten, CINTHIA BITTENCOURT SPRICIGO
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Shifting levels of thinking about teaching is a challenge in Higher Education. We have modified a course design approach for a faculty development project, which aimed students learning and reflective teaching. In three editions of 60 faculty members each, teaching plans were rewritten with course descriptions and learning outcomes to drive change in learning activities and assessment. This session describes the reflective practice of faculty developers observing difficulties and thoughts of faculty members during their learning process with a CIPP (context, input, process, product) model and how it has changed each project edition course in structure, content, extent and support.  

Rural Women: Decisions and Transitions to Post-Secondary Education

Room: Camellia
Colleen Webb
Session Track: Diversity
Rural female students comprise a significant proportion of the Canadian college and university landscape and frequently face unique barriers when accessing post-secondary education (PSE). There is little research focused on this important student group. Semi-structured interviews and journal entries were used in this study to create stories that highlight the barriers Canadian rural women encounter as they embark on PSE. Patriarchal structures, geographic location and lack of community support were emphasized as significant barriers when transitioning to PSE. This presentation will broaden the conversation around rural women’s journeys to PSE and offer suggestions to ameliorate barriers and promote success  

An Elusive Professoriate? How Emerging Identities Will Shape the Future of Academic Development

Room: Dunwoody A
Rania Sanford
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper builds on earlier research that explored the changing nature of faculty work and the pressures that faculty will continue to face in the future. The session reports the findings from a national survey study of academic developers and campus leaders (deans, provosts and presents) in the United States; 397 respondents shared their perceptions of the relative importance of domains beyond teaching and learning to their faculty’s success. We will discuss findings that point to the significance of institutional motivations to the purpose and function of academic development against a backdrop of an emergent identity of future faculty.  

Instructional Technology Skills Development in Faculty Staff: A Tool for Effective Teaching and Learning in Nigeria Tertiary Education

Room: Gardenia
Stella Nwosu
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The paper examined Nigerian faculty staff exposure and training on instructional delivery skills with three hundred Nigerian lecturers from three Universities from the South Nigeria using a questionnaire. The data collected was analyzed using means, percentages, and graphs. The findings revealed that most of the sampled lectures are not conversant with emerging trends in instruction, but indicated interest in updating their skills given the opportunity. This paper thus proposes the establishment of Instructional Technology units in Nigeria tertiary institutions where faculty/staff can be periodically exposed to techniques in instructional delivery and get solutions to instructional problems.And the exposure of students to emerging technologies in learning.

Make way for educational innovation! Dutch Senior University Teaching Qualification

Room: Oakwood A
Alice van de Vooren, Marije Hahnen
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Make way for educational innovation! Dutch Senior University Teaching Qualification. Both Erasmus University Rotterdam and University of Twente implemented a new educational vision, which puts more emphasis on student learning. With this paradigm shift, a task for teachers has emerged to implement innovative and stimulating learning activities.The Dutch Senior University Teaching Qualification (SUTQ) has been developed at both universities to support academic teachers. In this workshop we will elaborate on the building blocks of both SUTQ models, including design choices and dilemmas. By design assignments participants are invited to think about inspiring professionalization activities for senior academic staff.      

Measuring the transformational impact of educational development on how faculty teach and think about teaching

Room: Conference Center
Carol Hurney, Lori Leaman
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
To measure an institution's transformation toward a more learning-centered paradigm, assessment of professional development interventions should measure how faculty change the way they teach and the ways they think about teaching. This session examines how the Faculty Learning Outcomes Assessment Framework helps to develop survey items that measure the ways interventions such as workshops and learning communities transform faculty, their teaching, and their teaching identity. Participants will analyze the Faculty Learning Outcomes Assessment Framework based on results from a study of faculty at a small, liberal arts college who engaged in programming developed for a National Science Foundation grant.  

Using the SEEN Framework as an Academic Development Tool

Room: Dunwoody B
Amanda Gilbert
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper describes the use of the SEEN Framework, a tool developed to describe attributes that are not commonly assessed, to support academic development discussions about these attributes. Academic developers are often approached to help academics embed such attributes in their courses to enhance students’ employability. The framework provides a structure for conversations between academic developers and academics. Using examples of these conversations we show how existing practice can be analysed and alternative teaching activities identified. Academics who have engaged in this process report useful outcomes in relation to the development of specific teaching approaches and reflection on their practice.  

The Status Quo and Countermeasures of the Construction of Faculty Workforce in Newly-built Undergraduate Colleges in China

Room: Maplewood A
LULU LIU, Wei WU
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The purpose of this study was to explore the status quo of faculty workforce in 330 newly-built undergraduate colleges in China through statistical analysis. We found that the student-teacher ratio is too high, the structure of the faculty is unreasonable, the level of internationalization needs to be enhanced, the training coverage is not wide enough. The construction of the faculty workforce should focus on five points: to strengthen the top-level design, to ensure a reasonable student-teacher ratio, to optimize the structure of faculty, to enhance the international level of faculty and make full use of faculty development centers.

The Importance of Reflective Practice in the Process of Leadership Development

Room: Oakwood B
Ragina R. Mullucey
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Throughout time, successful leaders have used the tool of reflective practice to understand and learn from their experiences. Raelin (2002) suggests that through reflective practice we find clarity. The clarity of thought and process gained through reflection enables us to develop the skill of critical thinking (Merriam, Caffarella, & Baumgartner, 2007; Knowles, Holton III, & Swanson, 2015). Mezirow (1991) suggested that critical thinking and reflection are foundational in the transformative learning process and allow individuals to analyze and adjust beliefs through problem-solving. Therefore, reflective practice is vital to the process of leadership development and organizational growth.

Disrupting metaphors of coloniality to mediate social inclusion

Room: Camellia
Kasturi Behari-Leak, Goitsione Mokou
Session Track: Diversity
New voices emerging in the global South are contesting the academy’s elitist and exclusionary ethos by disrupting the normalcy of coloniality. This session explores the politics of ‘voice’ of the 'marginalized' who dare to ‘speak’ in authentic and provocative ways that call the university to action. We pose the questions: are alternative voices enough to inspire institutional change if traditional hierarchies of power remain intact? Are there tacit consequences for those who speak up and speak out? What does this mean for the collective project of re-imagining a univers(ity) that carries a promise of social inclusion and social justice?

Opportunities and challenges: Disaggregation and academic development practice and identities

Room: Dunwoody A
Rhonda Hallett
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper reports on academic developers’ perceptions of opportunities and challenges in the application of disaggregated learning to academic development. Survey and interview data was collected from academic developers in a network of 7 Australian Higher Education institutions who participated in a nationally funded project in 2016/17. Project participant’s activities stimulated discussions about the nature and scope of resource sharing for qualifications across institutions, and through this, the nature of contemporary academic development practice. Analysis of data identifies challenges and opportunities for academic development practice embedded in the concept of disaggregation, particularly in relation to organisational context, identity and power.  

Challenge Based Learning as a driver for Institutional Change

Room: Dunwoody C
Patricia Staaf, Cecilia Christersson
Session Track: Organizational Development
 Can a HEI pedagogical framework contribute to the development of a sustainable community, and also be a driver for the development of the institution itself? What happens when academic staff and students are invited to be part of the process of defining a pedagogy that will make HE relevant to societal transformation and at the same time supporting students to be able to meet and handle current and future challenges? This paper will present the ongoing process of developing a framework for Challenge Based Learning at Malmö University in Sweden and institutional implications of that work.  

Weighing the Value and Effectiveness of Teaching Awards

Room: Maplewood B
Robert Bledsoe, Deborah Richardson
Session Track: Organizational Development
Determining the value and effectiveness of teaching awards is a challenge. This presentation reports on an investigation in which faculty members from academic departments on the health science campus and the primarily undergraduate campus of a research university reported on their knowledge of about and attitudes toward a teaching award. Faculty members anticipated that the award would boost the winner’s dedication to teaching, they foresaw little impact on non-recipients. The presentation will engage the audience in a discussion of ways to structure awards to motivate non-recipients as well as alternative criteria and methods to assess the impact of teaching awards.

Cultivating excellence and evidencing value

Room: Conference Center
Karen M. Lauridsen
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Educational developers (EDs) are expected to be able to demonstrate the impact of what they do. This demand for accountability may be met by evidencing the value of a continuous professional development activity during and after the event. This paper presents an example of how such value may be evidenced by means of a pre- and post-course survey with a combination of quantitative and qualitative data based on the intended learning outcomes of the program in question. The qualitative data evidences participants’ anticipated behavioural change and the anticipated organizational change and support. A follow up will document actual change.

Adapting Formative Peer Review Principles to Online Course Evaluation

Room: Dunwoody B
Ron Legon, Yaping Gao
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
A distinguishing characteristic of online learning in the U.S. is the willingness of faculty members to invite their peers to view and comment on their online courses. While this phenomenon began locally and spontaneously, since 2003 Quality Matters has formalized this practice into a widely adopted process to certify the quality of online courses. This session will describe the underlying principles of faculty peer review for course quality assurance and its roots in the tradition of formative peer review in higher education. Attendees will learn how adopting these principles can win faculty support for quality assurance processes at their institutions. 

Graduate teaching assistants' use of collaborative learning scripts in lesson planning and micro-teaching

Room: Maplewood A
Mark Gan, Johan Geertsema
Session Track: Graduate Student Professional Development
Understanding and recognising how graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) carry out their teaching practice is of vital important as they play a key role in University teaching. However, their voices are often drowned in a complex environment, where competing demands, such as research and publications, jostle for time and attention. This study examined GTAs’ use of collaborative learning scripts through lesson planning and micro-teaching sessions. Findings are discussed in relation to academic developers’ understanding of how GTAs develop their knowledge and skills to engage students in meaningful collaborative learning and how best to design instructional support in learning how to teach.     

Developing a future-proof nursing curriculum: starting from vision to concrete design tools

Room: Oakwood A
Evelien Hast
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
On the one hand educators agree on the importance of integrating 21st century skills in curricula to assure graduates are ready for an unpredictable future, while on the other hand we struggle to implement this in our curricula fearing we’re not offering them enough content-knowledge to start their professional careers. Therefore we’re implementing a sustainable future-proof curriculum which gives our students the necessary tools to get started and to keep on learning. This session will guide you through our process of developing a student-centered curriculum focused on self-regulation, authentic learning and deep level integrated learning.    

Research on the professionalization of faculty developers in China:Based on the survey at Xiamen University

Room: Dunwoody A
Wei WU, CHAOYA WU
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This study aims to understand the professionalization of Chinese faculty developers. Literature analysis, questionnaire survey and interviews are applied. Two questions are addressed: What are the status, occupational threshold, professional literacy and professional promotion of Chinese faculty developers at research universities? How to improve their professionalization? A questionnaire survey of 111 full-time teachers was conducted and 6 faculty developers were interviewed in Xiamen University. The results were analyzed in three dimensions: identity and roles of faculty developer, professional literacy of faculty developer and professionalization measures: 1. The professional identity of Chinese faculty developer has not been recognized. 2. The background of them was complex and diversified. 3.The programs which had been launched were not highly targeted and effective.

Institutional Change and Educational Development supported by Faculty-wide Educational Framework Through Collaborative, Bottom-up Teamwork

Room: Dunwoody C
Petri Gudmundsson, Elisabeth Carlson, Christel Bahtsevani
Session Track: Organizational Development
This paper presents faculty-wide Educational framework with potential to bring about change in education. This was made possible through bottom-up teamwork, discovering underlying reasons for chosen educational approaches at the faculty, enabling educational discussions between colleagues. All colleagues at the departments were encouraged to review educational ideas and methods that they had in common, or wanted to develop. Uniting around educational methods, specified and published as educational frameworks, facilities continuous educational collaboration and development, and improves mutual understanding in discussions and collaborations with students, which can affect scholarship of teaching and learning as well as bringing about institutional change.   

Faculty Staff Development: Harnessing the Benefits

Room: Maplewood B
Clara Davies
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This session explores the drivers and benefits of supporting faculty staff to gain professional recognition for their teaching. A case study of one subject area where the proportion of staff with teaching recognition is high relative to the School they are within, and compared to the institution as a whole, will be presented. Drawing on interviews with teaching staff, the session will outline the impact on individual thinking and teaching practice and consider the collective benefits from having a cluster of staff from the same subject gaining recognition through a professional development process, plus how this can be further exploited.    

Measuring Institutional Transformation: A Multi-Level Evaluation of a New Faculty Development Program

Room: Conference Center
David Favre, Dorothe Bach
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
New faculty learning communities (FLCs) often claim success in shifting pedagogical beliefs and practices toward an increased learning-focused orientation while developing faculty’s sense of institutional connectedness. Frequently, these determinations lack rigor and nuance as they are often generated from indirect measures and measures that target isolated areas of complex change mechanisms. This paper reports on the design, tools and results of a more comprehensive assessment study that employs Kreber and Brook’s [7] impact model to better align instrumentation with levels of institutional impact. Findings at various levels indicate significant and transformative effects for FLCs on new faculty beliefs and practices.  

Developing the concept of workload: How SoTL projects can enhance educational development at institutional level

Room: Dunwoody B
Gudrun Geirsdottir
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
This paper gives an account of a SoTL project where the collaboration between an academic and an educational developer led to a more developed conception of student workload and influenced new practices at the institutional level. The intended outcome of the paper is to speculate about the possibilities of implementing similar models of collaboration on a larger scale within institutions.  

Effects of Peer-Facilitator-Training (Student Instructors) - Results and Challenges of Field Studies

Room: Maplewood A
Annette Glathe
Session Track: Adjunct Professional Development
The effects of training of peer facilitators (student instructors) for supplemental instruction courses have so far hardly been focused in research. This paper will present some results of a dissertation at Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany, on this topic: effects of training on peer facilitators themselves, like knowledge on teaching or the self-efficacy, as well as effects on students who participated in peer-led supplemental instruction courses, like results in exams. Furthermore, challenges in the field of higher education research will be discussed and ideas how to face them will be proposed.  

The Collegial Project Course: a systematic way towards institutional change

Room: Oakwood A
Roy Andersson
Session Track: Organizational Development
This paper presents and discusses how to support disciplinary communities of academic teachers to create a lasting change in educational culture. By stressing the similarities with the fully accepted research culture and their research knowledge this have been possible. Evaluations consistently show that participants appreciate the collegial approach. It offers them an opportunity to deal with challenges in their own practices together with others and to adapt concepts and perspectives from educational literature to their everyday teaching and learning. And maybe most of all it have provided them with a common language when discussing teaching and learning.

Flipping Faculty Development with the Hybrid and Online Teaching Institute

Room: Dunwoody A
Sara Kacin, Tonya Whitehead
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Are you looking for a hybrid or blended solution to faculty development?  This session, introduces our Hybrid and Online Teaching Institute (HOTI).  The institute is an innovative way to engage instructors through blended learning experiences that include both face-to-face and online learning environments.  In this interactive session, participants will be presented with the HOTI design and three years of assessment data; have an opportunity to share their experiences creating hybrid / online faculty development programs; and will leave with implementation frameworks and design strategies useful in adapting a hybrid faculty development learning experience for their campus.  

Facilitating Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning to Improve Courses and Programs

Room: Dunwoody C
Susan Colby
Session Track: Organizational Development
This presentation is based on a research study examining how Collaborative Analysis of Student Learning (CASL) was used at a comprehensive university by teams of faculty to improve student learning and teaching practice. The authors of this study sought to understand how CASL informed improvement efforts and what facilitators learned from the process. Findings suggested CASL results were helpful in identifying improvements, the facilitator’s role is crucial, and purposefully designed processes and protocols are imperative for successful implementation. This presentation will describe CASL theory and process, offer insights from the study, and provide guidelines for educational developers facilitating CASL

Articulating teaching aspirations to create meaningful reward structures

Room: Maplewood B
Bridget Arend, Virginia Pitts
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Higher education faculty members are expected to create meaningful and transformational learning experiences. However, faculty reward structures often discourage time and effort spent on teaching, and tend to measure superficial criteria. This paper will detail how one institution utilized elements from Design Thinking and Faculty Learning Communities to develop teaching aspiration statements that better reflect modern teaching identities. We aspire towards meaningful, learning-centered, inclusive, and reflective teaching practices. We are now using rapid prototyping to help academic departments across a decentralized campus develop new evaluation methods that support and reward these aspects of teaching our faculty identify as meaningful.

Working with Faculty of Color on a Predominantly White Campus

Room: Camellia
Mayuko Nakamura
Session Track: Diversity
An increasing number of publications discuss the marginalization and oppression of faculty of color in Predominantly White institutions (PWIs). Many roadblocks for minority faculty exist in the cultures and systems of PWIs. A theoretical perspective of Whiteness is used in analysis of cultures and systems of PWIs. Whiteness in PWIs is pervasive and manifests all aspects of university campus including curriculum co-curriculum, the hidden curriculum, as well as, faculty, staff and leadership positions and physical spaces.  Recognizing Whiteness in higher education would help educational developers increase their understanding of race relationship and its implication to faculty of color at PWIs.  

Examining time allocation and effective teaching practice: The changing roles of today’s faculty

Room: Dunwoody B
Thomas Nelson Laird, Allison BrckaLorenz
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Given the array of expectations and increased scrutiny from various stakeholders in the United States, faculty must be careful and intentional with how they balance their time. The categorization of faculty based on time used for teaching, research, and service raises some interesting points of discussion about the roles of today’s faculty. This interactive session explores how over 16,000 faculty from 154 colleges and universities in the U.S. spend their time on professorial activities, the consequences of more specialized roles for faculty, and how time allocation relates to effective teaching practices. Participants will be encouraged to share how these patterns of time allocation and faculty roles compare for faculty at their institution and as well as their regional context.

Graduate teaching assistants’ supervision of undergraduate student research: Sharing lived experiences.

Room: Maplewood A
Roeland van der Rijst, Daan Romein, Mayke Vereijken
Session Track: Graduate Student Professional Development
The small group setting of undergraduate research activities often demands the use of graduate teaching assistants (GTAs). Pedagogical training for GTAs will improve the value of their supervision during undergraduate student research. During a presentation we will show the benefits and challenges of creating shared lived experience of supervision of research activities for graduate students' development. Based on previous literature and data from our GTAs in training, we will provide a theoretical base for purposeful reflection on shared experiences. We present how to create shared lived experiences in a workshop format and use it for improving GTAs learning to teach and supervise undergraduate student research.

Three part harmony: Blending the voices of students, educational developers, and faculty members in curriculum development

Room: Oakwood A
Lori Goff, Kris Knorr
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Academics routinely engage in collaboration and peer review of one another’s work. Why is it, then, that we tend not to take a similar approach to collaborating with students on issues pertaining to their learning? Curriculum planning should be a shared responsibility that involves students.  We present a case study of a new course for upper-year students to engage in partnerships with faculty and educational developers, and through those partnerships, co-create learning modules that become part of a first-year science course. Participants will engage in discussion and brainstorm possibilities for partnering with students in curriculum development, review, or refinement at their institutions.  

Teachers interacting with students – an important (and potentially overlooked) domain for academic development during times of impact

Room: Conference Center
Torgny Roxå
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
This paper responds to increasingly common calls for academic developers to produce evidence of the impact of their work. It argues that theoretical models in use are imprecise and therefore fail to explain observed variations in professional development activities. To complement existing methods of evaluation, it suggests the value of attending to concrete situations where teachers interact with students, drawing on previous research on teachers’ thinking as they interact with and observe student learning. Thereby a more fine-grained framework emerges. Arguably improved models for design and evaluation of professional development activities might prove crucial for the survival of the profession.  
9:45am to 10:45am
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From Workshops to Webinars to Podcasts: Reaching Difficult to Reach Faculty

Room: Oakwood B
Rosemary Tyrrell
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Finding the best time to hold faculty development programs is challenging. When working with busy practitioner faculty, it is next to impossible. Daytime programs ask faculty to give up income from other jobs while evening and weekend programs ask faculty to give up precious time with their families. Either one is a big ask. In this session, we will explore lessons learned from one institution’s efforts to meet the needs of clinically based faculty by increasing the availability of faculty development offerings.  

Becoming Educational Developers - weaving identities

Room: Dunwoody B
Pam Parker, Carole Davis, Carolyn Hoessler, Cynthia Korpan, Celia Popovic, Fiona Smart, Denise Stockley, Mandy Frake-Mistak
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Educational developers require a range of knowledge and skills to enable them to work with colleagues to enhance teaching and learning activities. However, being able to clearly outline what knowledge and skills are needed has been problematic and has led to a paucity of programmes to prepare people for these roles. An international group of educational developers collaborated in designing a UK-Canadian pilot online programme for those who were considering or new to educational development. The panellists will interweave the perspectives of creators, tutors, and participant feedback about the online programme, and lessons learnt from the first offering.  

Gender effects within PBL

Room: Oakwood A
Stefan Braun
Session Track: Diversity
The workshop is a futher discussion and conclusion of a research project on implementing problem-based learn-ing (PBL) as a teaching method for higher education at the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University (DHBW)/Germany. The project investigates the impact of sustainable learning amongst the participating students by self-estimation over a period of three years through an experimental intervention design. The major findings show the deep and different impact of PBL towards women and men.  

Prove it! Evidencing high quality development needs, outcomes and impact

Room: Dunwoody A
Shelda Debowski
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The academic development context has become more volatile, with less surety about funding and sponsorship of key initiatives or innovations. It is increasingly necessary to build powerful cases to support investment in substantial initiatives, and to garner the resources (including staffing) required to undertake those programs or projects. This workshop offers guidance on how to build a case for an emerging need, evaluate the outcomes and impact of initiatives, and present that evidence in a way that will ensure it continues to be justified and sponsored. Areas to be explored include needs analysis, stakeholder consultation, program evaluation, and impact assessment.    

Creating and Maintaining Regional Consortia for Professional Development

Room: Maplewood B
Diana Ashe, Martha Diede, Douglas James
Session Track: Center Management
The benefits of higher education associations are well documented in both the literature (Blessinger and Cozza, 2016; Bletz and Dotolo, 2016) and our own experiences. Representing a long-standing regional consortium of 17 public institutions, we discuss and strategize how to translate international best practices in educational development into more local contexts given diverse political, financial, and organizational challenges. Our consortium reorganized in 2014 with new governing documents and meets twice in person and twice online each year. Participants will consider elements like charters, membership, scheduling, goals, purpose, etc., leaving with an action plan to guide post-conference activities.  

Faculty-led Teaching Centers: Peer-to-Peer Leadership Strategies

Room: Conference Center
Jonathan Hunt, Jody Greene, Sarah Capitelli, Nandini Bhattacharya
Session Track: Center Management
Faculty-directed teaching centers have unique advantages and challenges as we seek to lead our campuses toward positive change. In this session, participants will explore models for faculty-led teaching centers, with an emphasis on identifying strategies for 1) “peer leadership” in faculty development, and 2) collaboration with administration or other campus units. Presenters will describe faculty-led centers at three different northern California universities. Additionally, this interactive session models several active learning tasks appropriate for undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as faculty development workshops.

Teaching portfolios – for career and development

Room: Gardenia
Katarina Winka
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Teaching portfolios are often used as instruments to select among candidates for academic positions and teaching awards. Despite the increasing use of teaching portfolios, there are still questions raised regarding the validity of this method of documenting teaching achievements. In this workshop I invite the participants to try a step-wise method developed for connecting the teaching philosophy with concrete examples and authentic teaching materials (evidence) in the portfolio. The aim is to create teaching portfolios that are robust and authentic representations of the teacher’s skills. The participants will experience the stepwise model and learn about the rationale for each step.

The Art of Mindfulness: Transforming Faculty Development by Being Present

Room: Camellia
Ursula Sorensen
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Faculty burnout has become a critical issue in academia that extends from new faculty to seasoned faculty.  Burnout can come from several factors, but is especially due to stress that comes about because of professionals and personal responsibilities.  This session will introduce attendees to the concept of mindfulness and how we as faculty developers can incorporate aspects of mindfulness into our faculty development programs as a means of helping decrease stress and increase attention.  A mindfulness program that has been started at an American university will be presented along with data regarding how this program has affected faculty participants.   

Reflective Teaching for Integrative Learning

Room: Maplewood A
Mays Imad, Jenna Wild, Shekeycha Ward, Yvonne Perez
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
How does your academic and personal background affect the ways that you plan and teach your class or interact with students? Evidence shows that those being educated and working in a diverse environment are more likely to be intellectually flexible and creative, make meaningful contributions to their community, be an effective team player, and be successful leaders. Inclusive Teaching means teaching in ways that do not exclude students, accidentally or intentionally, from opportunities to learn. This session will examine the benefits and challenges of diversity and reflect on why some students may be excluded from the learning experience. We will discuss implicit bias and stereotype threat and offer practical strategies for making the classroom more equitable and inclusive.

Is Academic Development Ready for Academic Analytics?

Room: Dunwoody C
Brad Wuetherick
Session Track: Organizational Development
Academic analytics have become increasingly important as universities grapple with challenges of student success (Campbell, DeBlois, and Oblinger, 2007).  This workshop will briefly outline the process used for initiating an institutional academic analytics project at Dalhousie University. This workshop will use cases to engage the workshop participants in key conversations around: the ethical use of analytics data, and using analytics data to inform both individual course redesign and program level curriculum renewal.  Finally, the workshop will end by exploring strategies to ensure the readiness of academic developers who might be tasked with supporting the use of academic analytics.  
11:15am to 12:45pm
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Transferring Research Results into Intervention Actions in Teaching and Learning – Challenges and Methodological Questions for Academic Developers

Room: Dunwoody A
Marianne Merkt
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The german discussion about the challenge of transferring research results into intervention actions in teaching and learning arises from several funding lines of the German Ministry of Education and Research. Research designs often end with generating and presenting their results and leave the transfer question to practitioners. Academic Developers work as intermediators between research (results) and teaching and learning practitioners. This contribution looks at this intermediation task with a methodological perspective of research designs. Starting with Stokes quadrant model methodological questions referring to research aims, roles, intervention designs and outreach of Academic Developers will be discussed with the session participants.  

Reclaiming the Power of Consultations for Institutional Change

Room: Dunwoody C
Adriana Streifer, Dorothe Bach
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Originally, academic developers conceived of consultations in a humanistic mode of inquiry - a process that allows for the desires, experiences, and perspectives of the individual to drive their teaching development in the service of educational reform. In practice and in research, consultations often shrink in scope to troubleshooting and strategizing. How can academic developers reclaim consultations as tools for educational transformation? This sessions invites participants to envision new pathways for unleashing the power of consultations in the service of higher education reform. Conversations with faculty, consultants, and students offer evidence that a philosophical re-orientation of consultations is necessary and timely.

Peer Facilitators / Teaching Assistants in Study Groups: Which Teaching Skills do they need and how can they be developed? Peer Facilitators / Teaching Assistants in Study Groups: Which Teaching Skills do they need and how can they be developed?

Room: Maplewood A
Annette Glathe, Tobias Blank
Session Track: Adjunct Professional Development
Which teaching skills do peer facilitators / teaching assistants need to effectively support the learning of students in study groups (supplemental instruction courses)? And how can these skills be developed? In a dissertation at Technische Universität Darmstadt, Germany (Glathe, 2017), a model of teaching skills for peer facilitators was developed. It contains aspects of teaching competence like scaffolding, explaining, dealing with diversity, structuring the course and self-reflection. Furthermore some recommendations are presented how to develop those skills. Based on this model and the recommendations, we discuss different perspectives on these questions from worldwide experience in Higher Education. Further development of the competence model and training concepts could be achieved.

Exploring the use of course design narratives to enable co-design and sense-making in organisational change

Room: Oakwood B
Elizabeth Branigan
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper explores how to develop narratives that engage teaching teams to co-create whole course design for higher education programs. Course design, wherein learning outcomes, learning activities and assessments are aligned across a program of study, has emerged as a key means of achieving both positive educational outcomes and effective quality management in higher education. However, encouraging, engaging and enabling academic staff to undertake this can be an effort fraught with issues of power, identity and instability. This presentation explores how narratives can be used effectively to energise and engage teaching teams in whole course design.  

Change as a verb: On creating enabling environments

Room: Dunwoody B
Nicoline Herman
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Professional learning of academics for the teaching function is inherently a change imperative, positioned within the ambit of institutional teaching and learning centres. Professional learning with a focus on the professionalization of lecturers and the teaching role would subsequently lead to quality student learning. Creating an enabling environment where the wellbeing of academics is apparent, would raise their level of intrinsic motivation and could be a wise step in the pursuit of reaching institutional goals. The role of academic developers in creating such environments is the focus of this presentation. Delegates will be involved in a change management, brainstorm process.  

Traversing the borders of Online Teaching and Learning: The Instructional Innovation Incubator (i3)Model

Room: Gardenia
Michele Parker, Laura Cruz, Laura Cruz
Session Track: Technology
  Drawing from practices created to support global competitiveness and collaboration; the Instructional Innovation Incubator (i3) academy for online treaching was intentionally designed to cross pedagogical, geographical and institutional borders. In this interactive paper session, facilitators describe the i3 model, provide the results of a three-year pilot study designed to measure its effectiveness, engage participants in the evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of developing supra-institutional models of educational development; and challenge participants to consider how the i3 model might apply to on-line teaching and learning at their own campuses, systems, or states.  

Field-based Learning in Higher Education: Exploring the Benefits and Possibilities

Room: Oakwood A
Heather Fedesco, Drew Cavin, Regina Henares
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Field-based learning in higher education is lacking both in practice at colleges and in research within the academic literature. This study aims to address these deficits by exploring the benefits of, and suggesting strategies for, executing field study in higher education. We surveyed college students enrolled in classes that had a field study component versus no field study component. We found that students in courses with a field study component reported higher levels of motivation than students with no field study component. We suggest nine different field study typologies that could be employed in higher education.  

Student Success: Developing An Intervention for Coping Stress Among Chinese International Students

Room: Camellia
Qing Xia
Session Track: Diversity
Please enter your session abstract here (max 100 words).  The abstract will be published in the conference program if your proposal is accepted.  Chinese international students face many challenges in study and life in U.S. higher education institutions. Using Michigan State University as a research site, we found student behaviors may be subject to a subculture that remains unfamiliar to college administrators and faculty. To address these challenges, this study aims to develop an intervention after a clear portrait of various stresses faced by Chinese international students. The implication is to present a model for educational developers designing programs to prepare and educate their faculty and administrators about international students.  

Serial Engagement: Leveraging the Workshop Series to Drive Institutional Change

Room: Dunwoody C
Diane Boyd, Lindsay Doukopoulos
Session Track: Organizational Development
Accountability concerns in higher education provide a timely imperative for educational developers to articulate our centrality to institutional change (Stefani, 2010; Schroeder,  2012). Aligning our contributions with institutional strategic plans in a series of interactions of varying modalities (face-to-face, online) provides the necessary leverage to empower instructional and administrative colleagues and demonstrate positive outcomes. In this pre-conference workshop participants will analyze a case study and apply the backward design process to sketch a workshop series designed to support institutional change, including plans for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating data related to their work (Fink, 2005; Beach et.al, 2016).  

Academic Librarians’ Teacher Identity Development Through the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: A Mixed Methods Study

Room: Maplewood A
Lauren Hays
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Teaching is a primary responsibility of many academic librarians.  However, despite the job duties, many academic librarians do not see themselves as teachers.  To determine how participation in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) impacted academic instruction librarians’ teacher identities the presenter conducted an explanatory sequential mixed methods study.  Results from the quantitative survey demonstrated participation in SoTL did impact academic librarians’ teacher identities.  The qualitative interviews added depth to the researcher's understanding of the impact of involvement in SoTL by explaining the quantitative data.  The researcher used the theoretical framework Communities of Practice to discuss the results.   

Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age: Redesigning Assessment Strategies in Norwegian Higher Education

Room: Oakwood B
Robert Gray
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
In most courses in Norwegian universities, the classroom is primarily for information delivery, and the final examination is for information retrieval. Most research on student learning, however, recommends multiple points of formative and summative assessment. Therefore, the University of Bergen is implementing an initiative to help instructors redesign their courses to employ more authentic and educative assessment methods. The project aims to systematically redesign the assessment activities in over twenty courses. Key takeaways are insight into fundamental differences between higher education in America and Europe, efforts for institutional change and renewal, and awareness of innovative assessment practices and constructive alignment.

Implementing and Supporting the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning(SoTL)in Chinese Higher Education

Room: Dunwoody A
Li-ke Wang
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
The paper were to identify the main challenges related to the implementation and support of SoTL, and to explore strategies to facilitate SoTL in deferent Chinese universities. We surveyed faculty and faculty developer to explore how SoTL operates within existing frameworks for promotion institutionally. The survey yielded findings based on responses related to institution types, resources available to support SoTL, and qualitative responses to questions on the role of SoTL in institutions. Based on the survey, 10 directors of teaching centers were interviewed to identify specific ways and strategies to implement and support SoTL

Ours and theirs: transferability and ownership in transnational staff development

Room: Gardenia
Sally Alsford
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Global expansion of HE presents enticing market opportunities to Universities and ‘transnational’ provision of education is growing rapidly (HEGlobal 2016). The drive for professionalism and teaching excellence must inform our international strategies (O’Mahony 2014), and is seen in recent expansion of CPD provision to include transnational partners. Our research focuses on experiences and voices of staff at international partner institutions who are part of our online blended Postgraduate Certificate in HE. Research outcomes which will be presented raise and illustrate issues in international partnerships and staff development including: ‘cultural’ differences and relevance, assumptions about professionalism and pedagogy, enhancement and ownership.  

Migrant Academics and their Sense of Belongingness

Room: Maplewood B
Anesa Hosein, Namrata Rao
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
In today’s globalised world, migrant academics are commonplace. However, there is a still an expectation that migrant academics will arrive and seamlessly fit into the university machinery of teaching and research with often their needs and voices being inhibited. Seven migrant academics were interviewed about their feelings of belongingness with respect to teaching at their institutions. Migrant academics felt more belongingness when their teaching ethos aligned to that of the organisation. Universities, therefore, may need to look at promoting the migrant academic voice to help create a shared teaching ethos to ensure motivated migrant academic teaching staff.  

Critical Pedagogues of Color: Closing Opportunity Gaps through Mission-Minded Teaching

Room: Camellia
James E. Ford
Session Track: Diversity
Teachers are operating in a radically different social context than past generations. The demographics are changing rapidly with students of color and low-wealth populations constituting the majority of traditional public school enrollment. Additionally, even as access to educational opportunity is unequally distributed, it is a significant factor in determining the life chances of students.  Racial inequities persist for students of color at every facet of their educational experience. Teachers cannot solve all the problems created by system inequality, but teachers of color specifically must adopt different approaches to teaching and learning that interrograte the social structures that produces these outcomes.  

Helping Faculty Get Momentum: A leadership development program for Associate Professors

Room: Dunwoody B
Eric Fournier
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Associate Professors report low levels of job satisfaction and many experience what has been termed a “mid-career slump”.  This paper presents information about a unique faculty developmen program designed especially for mid-career faculty. The Center for Teaching. Learning, and Scholarship worked with author and executive coach Jason Womack to modify his Get Momentum program especially for higher ed faculty.  Two distinct cohorts of faculty (n=38) completed this year-long program, and most have expressed high levels of satisfaction and some have reported transformative professional experiences as a result.  The paper will share an overview of our program and discuss ways that elements of the program can be introduced at other colleges and universities.

Academic and information literacy for architecture students in collaboration between library and faculty

Room: Maplewood A
Ika Jorum
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
How can library and faculty enable architecture students to develop academic and information literacy competencies? This paper presents a collaborative project between librarians and teachers that developed as a result of changes in spatial conditions and that aims to foster a line of progression for academic and information literacy competencies from Year 1 to Year 3 students. The learning activities that the students take part in during the workshops in the library give them opportunities to develop a metacognitive approach to learning and to develop skills that can be transferred to contexts where searching for, evaluating and using information is needed. The assessment of the students assignments indicates improvements regarding academic and information literacy skills.

Exploring the implications of work-integrated learning for mining engineering training in traditional research universities; Case of South African universities.

Room: Oakwood A
Paul O Dipitso
Session Track: Graduate Student Professional Development
Please enter your session abstract here (max 100 words).  The abstract will be published in the conference program if your proposal is accepted.  The industry based experiences and development of work ready graduates have been a major source of debate for industry and universities. As a result, work- integrated learning emerged within the auspices of experiential learning theory as a potential means to address student job readiness and enhance employability. The purpose of this study is to explore what knowledge is embedded into curriculum to enhance work readiness for undergraduates in traditional research universities for their mining engineering bachelor degree programmes in South Africa.  

Promoting pedagogical awareness. Reading fiction for the purpose of inclusive teaching and learning

Room: Dunwoody A
Maria Wennerström Wohrne, Johan Wickström
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Academic teaching is intertwined with ethical issues. We would like to discuss how literary fiction might raise questions of power and identification: Fiction eases dealing with ethically and emotionally problems. It also promotes changing perspectives and identifying with others. Fiction supports a deeper social understanding by including emotional dimensions. Furthermore it enhances transformative learning and self-reflection. Finally, the “complexity and variety revealed to us in literature” (Nussbaum, 1992) reflects the complex character of pedagogical situations that are hardly fully described by models frequently used within educational development. It has therefore the potential to counteract reductive theories by offering alternative approaches.

The Research on University Administrative Staff Professional Development

Room: Dunwoody C
WENJIE XU
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Administrative staff in universities shoulders the important task of management and service, which is the indispensable role in the operation of universities. However, their professional development has not been realized fully, and their self-actualization needs could not be satisfied. For the administrative staffs professional development, colleges and universities should meet the basic life needs and security needs of administrative teachers by creating comfortable environment and improving their welfare, should meet their social needs by creating opportunities for them to exchange and study, should achieve the highest level of needs by setting a platform and encouraging administrative teachers to upgrade themselves.

Mentoring in academe: How women and men perceive differently the qualities and characteristics of their mentoring relationships.

Room: Maplewood B
Jane Fowler
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper describes male and female mentor and mentee perceptions about the qualities and characteristics of their mentoring relationships. Two rounds of interviews were conducted. First, 24 mentors and mentees (12 mentoring pairs), representing all four possible gender combinations of mentee-mentor were interviewed. Ten years later, 16 of those participants were re-interviewed. At both points in time, males and females reported having very positive and beneficial mentoring relationships. However, they voiced differently the qualities and characteristics of their relationships: women focused more on relational aspects such as collaboration, collegiality, and the process of the relationship, and men tended to focus more on position/power, outcomes, and achievements. Implications for mentoring relationships and programs are discussed.  

Reimagining Inclusion: A Six Point Model for Inclusive Teaching Excellence and Capacity Building

Room: Camellia
Tam'ra-Kay Francis, Taimi Olsen
Session Track: Diversity
As students become increasingly diverse, there is a push for faculty to continue to provide courses that engage all students. What is therefore needed is a framework that will (i) facilitate change in adoption of inclusive teaching practices in HE and (ii) promote institutional synergy and change. To this end, we propose an inclusive excellence framework that describes these inclusive practices as a way to improve student learning and enhance institutional capacity building. In this interactive session, participants will utilize this framework to develop strategies for cultivating sustainable faculty learning communities and institutional programs that promote the development of culturally responsive professional identities

A Concierge Approach to Faculty Consultation and Online Course Design

Room: Oakwood B
Bonnie Mullinix, David McCurry
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Individualized approaches to online course design benefit faculty and programs in numerous ways. Introducing a “concierge” approach, this paper describes working principles and steps used to support course development. The general approach addresses inherent problems with instructional design processes, which often operate based on deficit and discrepancy models rather than a strengths approach. The concierge approach re-centers the course development process around faculty strengths and knowledge as complemented by the skills and knowledge of a partner instructional designer. To guide this interaction, the paper offers “10 Concierge Keys of Supporting Individualized Online Course Development”. 

Change and stability – the Janusian life of academic teachers

Room: Dunwoody B
Torgny Roxå
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Three academic disciplinary workgroups responsible for education were observed longitudinally with the purpose of exploring sociocultural aspects of change and stability within academic teachers’ life-worlds in times of disruption. Findings indicate a sincere and constructively critical attitude among those involved. But the workgroups struggle to widen their respective horizon and formulate wider purposes. They therefore appear conservative, more as a consequence of an overwhelming complexity in their life-world rather than as a consequence of a political enterprise. This session gives educational developers further insights in the dynamic relationship between change and stability through the voices and identities of academic teachers.  

Learning through collaboration: towards sustained North-South University partnerships

Room: Gardenia
Hanna Posti-Ahokas
Session Track: Organizational Development
  Drawing on the experience of a Finland-Eritrea institutional capacity building project (Eritrea Learning for All 2015-2017), the paper discusses the conditions for building sustained partnerships between Universities under the existing development cooperation funding instruments. A qualitative content analysis of project documents, meeting minutes and participant feedback identified key lessons learnt for developing mutually meaningful, sustained partnerships. Through concrete examples, the presentation focuses on processes of building trustful, equal partnerships that genuinely contribute towards the strategic institutional priorities of partner institutions. The presented principles can be used as basis for planning, implementation and evaluation of higher education partnerships between the global North and the global South.

Integrating Industry Specific Training into Mainstream University Computer Science Curriculum: Case of SMU

Room: Oakwood A
Taurai Hungwe
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
This paper outlines the importance of integrating the industry-specific training (IST) into mainstream university Computer Science Curriculum (CSC), with special reference to the Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University (SMU), South Africa. This integration involves mixing what is available in the CSC and useful aspects from industry. Such a practice of IST content could significantly improve the quality of the Computer Science (CS) graduate. It also instils some industrial expertise in academics and students. The direct contact of industry experts with students can be a selling point when the industry considers recruitment of employees because it incorporates early mentorship of students into the world of work. Some benefits of the proposed approach are value addition, cost saving, empowerment and bridging the gap between theoretical knowledge and industrial practices.

Inclusive Pedagogy Grounded in Multiracial Feminist Theory

Room: Dunwoody A
Celeste Atkins
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
This session explores the work of a community college instructor who, based on her work as a doctoral student in Higher Education, sought to redefine and reshape her pedagogy.  She shares her journey from a pedagogy based on “I hated that as a student; what can I do differently?” to implementing a broadly inclusive and learner-centered pedagogy based on empirical evidence, yet shaped by multiracial feminism and intersectionality.  She also shares her struggles with the central feminist pedagogical concept of giving up power and her attempts to find commonality with her “radical activist” peers on social justice and education.  

What is it with education that make many critics leave their role as an informed researcher and argue on the basis of personal opinions?

Room: Dunwoody C
Roy Andersson, Oddfrid Førland
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
In this paper, we have analyzed a nationwide debate following the introduction of an individual merit system for educational development. When reforms are aimed towards research, even the toughest discussions can most often be resolved when arguments are backed by evidence. Not surprisingly, as this goes hand in hand with the language and mindset of the receivers in the research community. But, when it comes to reforms about educational development, the picture looks quite different. Here, evidence in not enough. Suddenly large parts of the research community behave in an unscholarly way, basing their arguments on personal opinions about teaching backed by what otherwise would be dismissed as anecdotal evidence.  

Educational Development Supports for Inquiry-Based Learning: A Case Study Exploration

Room: Maplewood A
Robin Mueller
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
The University of Calgary’s College for Discovery, Creativity, and Innovation has embraced inquiry-based learning as a flag-ship pedagogy, designing several courses that provide an inquiry “immersion” experience for students and instructors.  Engaging in inquiry-based learning can feel risky, ambiguous, and stressful, so our instructional and educational development team has begun to pilot structures within the College’s courses to better support instructors and students.  We will share the preliminary results of our research project investigating the implementation of course-embedded librarians and peer mentors as instructor and student supports in the context of inquiry-based learning courses.  

Conceptualizing Courses through Communicative reflexivity; Lecturers' Voices

Room: Oakwood B
Mary Omingo
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
 Lecturers across three continents, redesigned their courses in a four-day workshop through the process of communicative reflexivity. The small group model; groups of four facilitated by two facilitators enabled them to articulate their courses in terms of conceptual designs  such as cooking pots, bicycles, bridges and houses that reflect their lived experiences. Through intense engagement; reflecting and talking, with the facilitator and other participants, there was a big change in the way lecturers articulated their courses. Academic developers may want to explore the use of concept images in course redesign and how the process brings about curriculum and institutional change.   

Transforming Student Success in STEM Through Departmental Transformation Teams

Room: Dunwoody B
Christine Hartman, Sara Kacin, Andrew Feig, Karen Myhr, S. Asli Ozgun-Koca, Peter Hoffmann
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The WSU-SSTEP Fellows Program supports faculty-initiated, department-based projects to advance institutional transformation through incorporation of innovative teaching approaches in STEM courses. Fellows commit to working as a team to implement student-centered, evidence-based teaching methods with support from an instructional designer and participate in an interdisciplinary learning community to engage with peers and campus leaders of educational innovation. Session participants will explore our model for institutional change and reflect on ideas for engaging diverse teams including faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate students in undergraduate STEM education transformation efforts on their own campus. This work is supported by a grant from the NSF.

The Online Course: Who Builds It, Who Owns It? Findings of the 2018 CHLOE Report

Room: Gardenia
Ron Legon
Session Track: Organizational Development
The national Changing Landscape of Online Education (CHLOE) Survey of Chief Online Officers at 180 U.S. colleges and universities reveals patterns of online course development and ownership. This session explores where institutions place the primary responsibility for online course development, whether they rely on external providers or pay development stipends and other incentives to faculty, the extent of instructional design input they make available, whether they encourage synchronous and face-to-face meetings, and their course ownership practices. Attendees will gain a better understanding of the course development choices their institutions face and the pros and cons of each.  

Centre Leaders Learning: Towards an integrative and integrated educational development leadership?

Room: Oakwood A
Johan Geertsema, Roberto Di Napoli
Session Track: Organizational Development
We take a duoethnographic approach in order to study and interpret ourselves as sites of inquiry about leadership within the field of educational development. Our point of departure is a shared philosophical commitment to the importance of fostering an integrated approach to ‘academic practice’. Given the importance of institutional contexts, we will invite those in the audience to reflect on and relate their own experience of, and scholarly inquiry into, leadership of educational development. Our findings may be useful for other leaders in pushing forward current ways of understanding ‘leadership’ in the context of educational development and academic practice.
12:45pm to 1:45pm
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Lunch. Let's Eat!

Room: Ravinia Ballroom
Lunch included in your registration. 
2:00pm to 3:00pm
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Fostering Deeper Sessional/Adjunct Faculty Socialization through Transforming Programming

Room: Dunwoody B
Mandy McGrew, Lindsay Bernhagen, Ann Coburn-Collins, Teresa Focarile
Session Track: Adjunct Professional Development
Sessional faculty make-up over half of the teaching force in American and Australian higher education and their numbers are increasing globally. Therefore, it is essential that educational developers think about and create programming for this population. This panel of developers with experience providing programming for sessional/adjunct/part-time faculty will share their understanding of adjunct faculty needs and the strategies they have used to provide programming and support to sessional faculty. Panelists will also share programming options that integrate sessional faculty into a culture of teaching and learning. 

The Shape of Things to Come: A Brave New World?

Room: Maplewood B
Allyson Skene
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Learning analytics promise rich sources of evidence to inform educational decision-making (e.g., HEC, 2016).  New access to student data trails, combined with demographic information, help us to identify “at risk” students, “engage” them with customized learning experiences, fostering their “success”. This promise, however, comes with risks (Lawson et al, 2016; Wise & Shaffer, 2015).  The pathway from statistical significance in learning analytics to significant learning (Fink, 2003) is not straightforward.  This workshop will explore how big data intersects with significant learning.    We will interrogate constructs such as “engagement”, “at risk”, and “success”,  and unpack  epistemological assumptions underlying learning analytics.  

Assessment of Teaching Portfolios

Room: Dunwoody A
Thomas Olsson, Torgny Roxå
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Teaching portfolios are qualitative documents commonly used when teachers present and analyse their actual teaching practice. In this workshop, we will explore and discuss assessment of teaching portfolios, and we will focus on the concrete assessment process. What should we look for in a teaching portfolio? What evidence do we need? Which are the main pitfalls? How can we teach others to perform assessments of high quality? Which are the main differences between experienced assessors and beginners? After the workshop, participants will have experienced the complexity of assessing teaching portfolios and the importance of scholarly assessment strategies.  

Understanding and Fostering Faculty Change in Teaching

Room: Maplewood A
Jessie Moore, Torgny Roxå, Deandra Little, Kathryn Sutherland, David Green
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Representing an international, multi-institutional research team, the panel presents a theoretical framework for understanding what prompts academic staff/faculty to change towards sustained use of pedagogies that make a meaningful difference in student learning and examines the role of academic developers in this work. Speakers share snapshots of research projects that test or illustrate the framework and then facilitate discussion about how the theory contributes to work on educational development’s role in institutional change around teaching.

TiLTing Upward: Clarifying Assignments and Empowering Students

Room: Camellia
Denise Domizi, Marina Smitherman, Jesse Bishop, Rod McRae
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Based on the Transparency in Learning and Teaching (TiLT) work of Mary-Ann Winkelmes from University of Nevada-Las Vegas, participants will practice how to make an assignment highly transparent by clearly defining its purpose, the specific tasks students will perform, and criteria for success. Facilitators will model this process by helping participants work through sample assignments to make them more transparent. Research shows that, with minimal training, faculty who make two course assignments transparent leads students to gains in academic confidence, sense of belonging, and mastery of those skills most valued by employers. Results are particularly strong with historically at-risk students.  

Leveling the Hiring Process—How a Teaching and Learning Center Can Create Greater Equity and Fit During Hire

Room: Gardenia
Terry Pollard, Jeanine Irons, Martha Diede
Session Track: Center Management
The Coulter Faculty Commons at Western Carolina University developed a performance-based instrument to create a more equitable process for evaluating faculty developer candidates. Through a partnership with the department of Human Resource Management, the center developed an instrument in order to best ascertain candidate competency in the domains of work ethic, humility, integrity, and motivation. Center staff first learned of these principles in the book Hire on a W.H.I.M. by Garrett Miller, who will be joining the panel. The five panelists include the book’s author, the Faculty Commons Director, the Senior Educational Developer, the hired candidate, and an assistant professor.  

An international program for academic development on leadership for educational change by a community of practice.

Room: Oakwood B
Mirjam Bastings, Riekje de Jong
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
  In the Netherlands, Utrecht University (UU) has a lot of experience with one of the first academic development programs on Leadership for Educational Change in Europe. The participants are senior academics, involved as (informal) leaders in innovation of teaching and learning. One of the positive effects of this program is a community of practice that benefits educational change. Let’s explore the possibilities of an international program for academic development on leadership for educational change. With as an important effect an international community op practice that benefits educational change. What are the secrets for this program to succeed?

Understanding and Changing Institutional Teaching Culture: Cultivating Effective Practices

Room: Dunwoody C
Donna Ellis, Lori Goff, Erika Kustra
Session Track: Organizational Development
How do we know whether an institution values quality teaching? Nine Canadian teaching centre leaders have developed a set of Teaching Culture Perception Surveys to better understand the perceived teaching culture at our institutions (Kustra, et al, 2014). After providing a project overview, we will engage participants in exploring elements of our survey reports and a supplemental resource that identifies effective practices to affect institutional teaching culture. By the end of the session, participants will be able to articulate key cultural indicators and share effective practices that foster a culture that values teaching.  

Inclusive educational practices: Using social psychology to address the diversity of learners in our classrooms

Room: Oakwood A
Crystal Tse
Session Track: Diversity
How can we recognize, address, and empower the diversity in our learners’ voices, identities, and backgrounds in our classrooms? This session focuses on evidence-based practices from social psychological research that instructors can readily implement into their courses (see Harackiewicz & Priniski, 2018) such as re-appraising stress, increasing feelings of belonging, addressing implicit bias, and giving critical feedback, as well as large-scale field interventions that have been shown to help close gaps in belonging and achievement (Yeager & Walton, 2011). Participants will reflect on and brainstorm strategies to address student diversity and inclusivity in their own roles and institutional contexts.