Schedule

You may download the full conference program here: 2018 ICED Program

8:00am to 9:30am
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Inclusion of Literacy Programme in Teacher Education Curriculum in Anglophone African Countries: The Synthetic Phonics Action Research in Nigeria

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Innocent Nwosu, Naomi Foxcroft, Stella Nwosu
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Learning English Language and using it to learn other subjects have been difficult and a barrier to the educational achievements and aspirations of students in Anglophone Africa.  Nigeria has recorded low English literacy rate of 59.6% and high failure rates in State examinations. A literacy intervention project using synthetic phonics method, by the Nigerian government, across its States in collaboration with two UK based organizations has proved to be effective in increasing the literacy levels of Nigerian pupils. This paper describes this research and need to include the method in the curriculum of tertiary institutions in Anglophone Africa.    

Supporting systemic change through critical reflection in higher education in kenya

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Patrick Kigunda, Mary Omingo
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Higher Education in Kenya faces numerous challenges. Here, Universities have proliferated from one in 1970 to 73 in 2017. Such an increase raises pedagogical quality concerns. The Association for Faculty Enrichnment in Learning and Teaching endevours to nurture deeply reflective and transformative student learning experiences. Here we explore how the use of critical reflections facilitated 12 AFELT members learning during a two- week online curriculum design course. Through the reflction process participants examined and challenged their implict beliefs and values about their teaching. We used content analysis to investigate member's reflections. For systemic change in higher education, faculty need to become reflective practitioners.  

Expanding a SoTL Community of Practice via Librarian and Faculty Development Collaboration to Create a Dynamic SoTL Database

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Amy Minix, Shannon Sipes
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
This poster shares a novel implementation of communities of practice (CoP) theory in the form of a dynamic database created via a collaboration between faculty developers and librarians.  The database functions much like other library databases, allowing users to search for SoTL work by their colleagues.  In addition, the database provides open access to the materials when available. The goal of this database is to facilitate visibility of and access to SoTL work on campus.  It is our hope that through this database we can create new connections across campus, expanding the SoTL CoP, and facilitating new collaborations.  

It Takes a Village: The roles of faculty, staff, and family in student transformation

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Sarah Lashley
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Numerous opportunities for students to construct their own senses of self and relationships with the world are presented during a student’s undergraduate career. A variety of individuals, including faculty, staff, family, and friends, have the potential to facilitate these opportunities and play an important role in a student’s educational transformation. This project uses data from Centre College’s Honor Walk, a ceremony during which graduating students have the opportunity to honor one or two individuals who have played important roles in their undergraduate careers, to shed light on the relationships, interactions, and opportunities, from a student’s perspective, that transform their undergraduate experiences.   

Defining What Matters to Faculty: Aligning Programming by Assessing Needs

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Cynthia Cogswell, Elli Goudzwaard
Session Track: Organizational Development
To fit our small, liberal arts campus context, our center created and administered a teaching needs assessment with faculty by attending academic department meetings. This poster provides the context, process, and initial results from this ongoing initiative. The content presented will be valuable to faculty developers and administrators interested in collecting data from their constituents, and to anyone interested in utilizing survey research to evaluate faculty needs and interests in regard to teaching.

Expanding our Reach through an Innovative Curriculum Series

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Frances Kalu
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The curriculum review process at the University of Calgary is a mandatory process with the goal of improving teaching and learning through a clear emphasis on articulating, aligning and assessing learning outcomes for specific programs of study. We provide consultative leadership to faculties undergoing the curriculum review process through consultations, resource development and invited presentations. To reach a wider audience, we developed an innovative curriculum workshop series, which also serves as a community of practice for faculties undergoing the curriculum review process. This poster describes the six individual components of the series, unpacking the expected outcomes and challenges faced.

Lessons learned from 30 years Problem Based Learning as an institution wide concept of education

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Adalgard Willemsma
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
About 30 years ago, Stenden University of Applied Sciences (NL, Europe) introduced problem based learning (PBL) as a new institutional concept of education. Through semi-structured interviews 40 lecturers were asked to elaborate on earlier given answers (questionnaire). It shows that all lecturers view PBL as a method or tool to be used in groups of 12 students twice a week. For some of them PBL is also an educational concept based on social-constructivism. They mention various reasons why the principles of PBL are less visible while executing PBL. Some of these reasons are: the questionable quality of the PBL tasks, assessments that are inconsistent with PBL principles and the lack of sharing experiences and indebt dialogue about PBL in the team of tutors. Recommendations to keep the essence of a concept of education alive finalize the presentation.

Virtual & Augmented reality: preparing students for a clinical practice experience

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Paul McLiesh
Session Track: Technology
The poster describes a teaching/research project that has created a 360degree video of an actual operating room (OR) with staff simulating an active surgical procedure. Prior to attending clinical placement in OR the student is able to view the resource with the use of a Virtual Reality (VR) headset and be immersed in the OR environment. Throughout the video, staff in the OR describe their role and what is expected of the student during that clinical placement. The purpose is to allow the student time and opportunity to prepare for the OR setting prior to being there in real life. This delivers an immersive experience in a safe, repeatable and consistent manner.      

Assessing the Effectiveness of a College Teaching Certificate Program

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Erin Dokter, Ingrid Novodvorsky
Session Track: Graduate Student Professional Development
Responding to the need for increased teaching development of graduate students, our institution offers a 10-credit graduate certificate program in college teaching, open to post-baccalaureates across disciplines. This poster presents preliminary results of a systematic, multi-year assessment of the program intended for improvement. Data from a subset of the over 170 graduates includes student work, feedback surveys from students and faculty, demographic and course data, and course evaluations. The logic model, rubrics, student surveys, and other instruments used to plan and implement the assessment will be shared to inform those at other institutions.  

Faculty near-peer mentoring exchange for early career faculty

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Laurel Willingham-McLain
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This poster outlines the program design and researched benefits of a university-wide, group-based, near-peer faculty mentoring exchange.  We facilitate peer leadership by early career faculty who have just succeeded at the steps incoming faculty face.  Often overlooked, recently hired tenure stream and non-tenure stream faculty, alike, play a significant role in shaping university culture.  Robust themes from six focus groups reveal interrelated benefits: connection, broadened university perspectives, safety and support, reciprocal mentoring, and shared experiences despite different disciplinary homes.  Participants state that the group members’ varied disciplines and experience levels are key features.  They also note challenges and articulate solutions.

Ethical competence in diversity and equality

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Ulrika Svalfors
Session Track: Diversity
Two values that teachers in higher education are obliged to promote amongst students in Europe are diversity and equality. Different theories and practices have emerged in response to this need to implement these values. All of these strategies aim at making the teaching practices more inclusive. This poster will present different discourses of inclusive teaching in higher education, and what kind of ethical competence they enable amongst students. The aim of the poster is to promote reflection on ethical competence in higher education. The conference participants will be invited to contribute by writing or drawing ideas on piece of papers.  

Tandems for Educational Development: A novel approach to accelerate conceptual change in KIT’s faculties

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Katrin Hess, Katrin Klink
Session Track: Organizational Development
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) has set a sophisticated objective with its strategy KIT2025. The strategy comprises the mission statement on teaching and learning which focuses on Constructive Alignment and Research-based Teaching. As KIT‘s department of Educational Development we foster this conceptual change and support KIT‘s faculties implementing the mission statement. Top-down transformations are often accompanied by fears and resistance. Additionally, universities are highly diverse and each faculty/discipline has its own culture and specifics. To support this transformation, we developed the concept of “Tandems for Educational Development”. The idea is to link an employee from the department of Educational Development with one of an academic faculty, so they can work closely together and benefit from each other.

Who am I? The Identity Crisis of a Researching Academic Developer

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Cristina Cottom, Angela Atwell
Session Track: Center Management
According to social identity theory, academic developers experience role conflict. This struggle stems from responsibilities that fall into various professional categories. An academic developer is both staff and faculty; both developer and researcher. These differing identities often have contradictory purposes, leaving the academic developer conflicted. In this poster session, two researching academic developers explore the challenges and benefits of this identity crisis.

Sage on a [smaller] stage: didactic teaching at an elite liberal arts college

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Lynn Mandeltort
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Compelling calls for reform in science education are decades old. Despite deeper understanding of how learning works, a majority of college science courses in the U.S. are still taught in didactic (passive) style. Our data suggest that the cocoon of a small liberal arts college is similarly slow to adopt more active teaching styles. Despite smaller course enrollments and an emphasis on teaching responsibilities, faculty at a small liberal arts college preferentially utilize didactic pedagogy. Faculty challenges, although different between large research institutions and small colleges, still result in limited adoption of high impact teaching practices. Faculty development at small colleges must pay attention to the situational factors in our unique ecosystems.  

Strategies and Implement Ways for a Teaching and Learning Center in Promoting Academic Development on Campus: the Case of CTLD of Shanghai Jiao Tong University ,China

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Li-ke Wang, name name, Wenting Xing, Zhujun Wang
Session Track: Organizational Development
A Teaching and Learning Center can play an important role in academic development in Higher Education. As one of 30 National Model Centers in China, the Center for Teaching and Learning Development (CTLD), Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU) was established in 2011. Based on empirical evidence, CTLD academic developers are promoting academic development through the following strategies and implement ways: (1)promoting new teaching ideas and innovation practice through various programs ; (2)advancing a culture of teaching excellence; (3)facilitating scholarship of teaching and learning; (4)building an interactive professional learning community. Overall, the strategies are effectively facilitating the university academic development in different ways.

Interrogating the Role of Academic Developers in the Promotion of Scholarly Teaching and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Newman Wadesango
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
In this paper the researcher sought to examine the role of academic developers in universities in the promotion of scholarly teaching (ST) and scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL). The concepts ST and SoTL are explained and their differences outlined. The researcher further discusses the significance of SoTL in the enhancement of teaching and learning in higher education.  In the study the researcher also examines the role academic developers should play in ensuring the nurturing and development of SoTL. Possible hindrances and challenges in academic developers’ role in promoting SoTL  are also evaluated and solutions suggested.

A barrier to change? Measuring instructor self-efficacy with active learning

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Katherine Raichle
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Why do evidence-based pedagogical practices not always transfer to the classroom? As educational developers, we seek to teach and substantiate the value of these practices, yet barriers persist.  In this study, we examine one such potential barrier to faculty change: self-efficacy.  Focusing on “facilitation of active learning,” we designed a 12-item scale of instructor self-efficacy, distributed to faculty at a US university.  The psychometric properties reveal excellent internal reliability and a single factor.  This potential quantitative tool examines a psychological barrier to, or catalyst for, faculty change, as well as a means to evaluate the impact of educational development.

Academic middle manager’s approaches to management

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Camilla Østerberg Rump, Thomas Harboe
Session Track: Organizational Development
In a previous study based on a questionnaire survey (Harboe, Rump, Hyldegård, & Bruun 2016), we have used explorative factor analysis to identify three approaches to academic middle management among heads of study, and other academic leaders. The approaches were ‘management by walking about’, the ‘bureaucratic, strategic approach’, and ‘scholarship of academic management’. Approaches are contextual, so any one academic middle manager can use any approach based on the situation, but they may have individual preferences. In this paper, we explore the nature of these approaches in depth.  

Staff Participation in Vice Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Awards: Why Develop Cold Feet?

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Newman Wadesango
Session Track: Organizational Development
This phenomenological study explored factors that hinder academic staff from being involved in activities related to teaching excellence in universities. The study adopted a qualitative research methodology. A sample of 30 academics was drawn from three institutions and data were collected using both closed and open ended questionnaires. ATLAS ti software was used to analyse data. Results showed that the respondents had various attitudes towards VC awards that hindered them from responding to calls for applications. Another reason was also the demands of coming up with a portfolio as well as the time it takes. 

Critical Components of International Faculty Development: A Case Study of a US-Japan Collaboration

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Jennifer Valad
Session Track: Diversity
  We describe the critical components of a course on Teaching in English, designed as part of a four-year Global Faculty Development program held at an institution in the United States (Queens College) in collaboration with three institutions from Japan (Toyohashi University of Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, and the National Institute of Technology (NIT: KOSEN).  The course focused on pedagogies for global classrooms, and we argue its success centered on the incorporation of a strong group dynamic (fostering feelings of belongingness for the faculty participants) and the use of structured content on pedagogical practices.

Supporting Institutional Change through Leadership Development

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Emily Smith
Session Track: Organizational Development
Department chairs and other mid-level leaders hold crucial leadership positions in higher education. They ensure quality programs and are key players in leveraging cultural change at the student, department and institutional levels. However, chairs are typically ill-prepared for these complex challenges, and their development is too often left to chance. This session takes up this call by culling insights about effective chair development from our leadership development efforts and the chair development literature. We tease out features and dilemmas of effective leadership development for mid-level leaders in hopes of contributing to a shared body of knowledge.  

Faculty as Student: Perceptions on the blended/hybrid experience as a teacher

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Jean K. Bennett
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
What happens when faculty become the student in a blended/hybrid experience? Faculty experiencing a blended/hybrid course while developing a blended/hybrid course recounts to Knowles’ 2nd principle of andragogy, experience. In a review of the literature, there is a demonstrated need for faculty perceptions as students in their professional development and how this experience affects their practice. This project addresses the experience as the teacher for faculty, and the attitudes of faculty towards their development of blended/hybrid courses because of this experience. Study of faculty attitudes and their development of blended/hybrid courses based on the experience should inform professional development.  

Remedying Structural Alienation in Large Online Undergraduate Courses

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Amir Kalan
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
In this presentation, the instructor of a large credit earning online course in a high ranking Canadian university and one of the teaching assistants of the course report how they conducted a critical action research project in order to fight back the constraints resulting from the online format of the course and the large number of the students (up to 700). The presenters highlight how profit oriented neoliberal business models, currently adopted by higher education, are oblivious to the pedagogical quality of large undergraduate online courses as long as there is enough enrollment.

Faculty development: Considering the values and needs of part-time and tenured faculty

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Abigail Snook, Dr. Asta B Schram
Session Track: Adjunct Professional Development
The needs of both tenured and part-time teachers should be considered in faculty development. An online survey, assessing identification with teaching, motivations to teach, and needs, was completed by 78 tenured and 160 part-time teachers. The results demonstrated many similarities in motivations to teach, identification with teaching, and needs. Part-time teachers, often comprising most of the workforce, expressed greater needs for instruction and connectedness to their department, including appreciation for improving their teaching methods. These results suggest areas for improvement in faculty development to address the needs of both part-time and tenured faculty to increase the quality of student learning.

The Concept of Faculty Development Reconsidered: Addressing Boyer's four scholarships

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Hiroaki Sato
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Osaka University has just started programs for newly hired teachers based on the new concept since 2017. Faculty development programs traditionally have covered mainly teaching and learning. However, society needs us more holistic approach for it. This programs cover four functions of faculty; education, research, social engagement and leadership. These are addressing the four scholarships by Boyer (1997). For offering these contents, the teaching and learning support center is trying to make new connection with other organizations within institutions. It is now time to reconsider the concept and approach of faculty development.

A customer discovery approach to faculty and staff needs assessment

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Ella Ingram, Dwuena Wyre
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The voices of the people served by educational developers combined with institutional vision should drive programming decisions. To illustrate this combination, a staff-serving office and a faculty-serving office jointly implemented a comprehensive needs assessment of employees at a small college. Burkett’s (2016) framework of a resilient learning organization guided the assessment, since it fit with the strategic and academic master plans. The framework, assessment model, activities, and key outcomes of this work are presented. This approach scales, and fits varied institutional contexts. By listening to diverse voices, opportunities were identified for quick wins and for long-range planning.

Cyber Weapons & Internet Safety: Protecting Our Children in the Digital World

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Chris Lombardozzi
Session Track: Technology
The Internet has drastically changed the way our children interact with the world. It provides them with seemingly infinite opportunities to discover new things, ways to express themselves, the ability to communicate globally and to make new connections with just the click of a button. Yet along with offering rapidly emerging and fascinating ways to connect with the world, technology also brings new risks. This presentation will explore techniques for monitoring child Internet activities as well as the unique threats that exist while using computers, mobile devices and the Internet: popular social media applications; sexual predators and child sexual exploitation; the dangers of public Wi-Fi; cyberbullying; online impersonation; pornography; sexting and other high-risk behaviors.

Trial FD Workshop for Improving College Teacher Pedagogical Techniques

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Tomomi Kaneko
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
University faculty members have accumulated and reinforced their own teaching methods based on educational experiences from their university lessons because they have no experience with teacher training courses at university. Therefore, their techniques depend to a great degree on personal experience. To resolve these difficulties, the authors attempt to arrange a practical FD workshop at which a seminar lecturer of a private company conducts a self-development seminar for students of our college, with faculty members observing the seminar. After the workshop, seminar lecturers and faculty members discussed "What you were intending to do" and the impressions of faculty members’ observations.  

The opinions of university teachers to the goals and role of feedback given by students towards their professional development and expectations for improving the feedback system

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Marit Sepma, Liina Lepp, Marvi Remmik, Liana Roos
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Collecting feedback on the organization and content of teaching creates a base for university teachers’ development. The aim of this study was to describe the university teachers’ opinions to the feedback given by students and its’ meaning in their professional development. 20 university teachers were interviewed and the data were analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. The results point that on the one hand feedback is seen as a chance for professional development and on the other hand, it is considered to be a means of external control which can lead to decisions about human resources within the department.

Using Story to Reflect on Our Identities as Educational Developers

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Jenn Shinaberger
Session Track: Organizational Development
  As educational developers, telling stories is central to our role as change agents. We tell our stories through personal contact, websites, social media, annual reports, assessment, consultations, teaching, research and many other artifacts. We use story and personal narrative to discuss events, keep traditions alive, relate information, share inspiration, persuade and many more reasons. Story is one of the most powerful ways to teach and engage. This poster session will challenge educational developers to consider and analyze how their core stories can be used to help give voice to our work, define our identity and position ourselves within our institutions.    

‘Classroom walk-throughs’ as a management approach

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Thomas Harboe, Camilla Østerberg Rump
Session Track: Organizational Development
This paper examines the degree to which heads of studies apply observation of classroom teaching as a strategic tool to identify and monitor didactic quality and development. The empirical data falls into three categories. Firstly, two heads of studies have been interviewed (October 2017) in depth in order to gain an understanding of existing possibilities and challenges when heads of studies observe teaching. Secondly, 600 university -teachers have been surveyed (November 2017) in order to get an insight in how teachers perceives 'classroom walk-throughs' as a managerial tool. Furthermore, there is a plan to collect case material on how 'classroom walk-throughs' can take place (spring 2018), and the paper will therefore discuss the possibilities and challenges associated with different forms of walk-throughs. 

Does a rapid prototyping method stimulate our time-pressured teachers to design rich and blended learning environments?

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Delphine Wante
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
VIVES aims at connected curricula and our main focus is on blended learning. Upgrading face-to-face approaches towards more blended learning formats demands new instructional design. A question that arises is how do we best help our time-pressured teachers in this process in order to develop rich blended courses? Many of the current methods of learning design consultancy seemed to be support-intensive, time consuming and therefore poorly scalable. The ‘ABC curriculum design method’ based on research from University College London (Young & Petrovic, 2016), meets with our concerns. The key of the approach is pace, engagement and collaboration. Focus interviews will be used to gain insight in the effect and the long-term results of teachers who followed the workshops at VIVES University college in order to optimize the method.

Facilitating the academic developer’s voice in a faculty led model toward institutional change.

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Esmarie Strydom, Annelize Cronje
Session Track: Organizational Development
Academic development units are often subjected to institutional changes for transformation and needs to be responsive to needs of the institution, academic staff and students. In a recent major restructuring process the AD unit was once against subject to change. In order to include the voice of the developers and academics in a faculty led model for academic development an inclusive consultative approach was followed which is in line with the organizational culture. This evident by behaviors congruent with ethics, trust, care, robust engagement, teamwork at leadership level, valuing of diversity and transformation.  

Higher Education lecturer role identity (efficacy) in the face of changing institutions and implications for Professional Development at institutions in South Africa.

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Owence Chabaya, Newman Wadesango
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Higher education has been characterized by change in the past decades. In South Africa, increased access to higher education after independence in 1994 has had effects on academics’ role identification. This study aims to examine the extent to which professional development programmes at two South African Universities promote lecturer role efficacy in the face of changing institutions. Guided by Bandura’s self-efficacy theory, this qualitative case study  will collect data from academics and professional development practitioners through interviews and questionnaires. Findings will provide insights on how academic staff development programmes can include development of professional efficacy in the face of change.

School Cultural Variables and Student Learning Outcomes in Ekiti State, Nigeria

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Foluso Adeleke
Session Track: Diversity
The study investigated relationship between school cultural variables (teachers’ self-efficacy, academic optimism, culture of control) and students’ learning outcomes in Ekiti State, Nigeria. The descriptive survey type of research design was used for the study. The sample size consisted of 300 teachers. Questionnaire and Inventory were used to collect data. Two research questions were raised and six hypotheses were formulated.  Significant relationship was observed between school cultural variables and students’ learning outcomes. It is recommended that government as a matter of policy should emphasize school culture in secondary schools. Keywords: School Culture, academic optimism, culture of control, teachers’ efficacy, students’ learning outcomes

When Results of Teaching Evaluation do not Mirror the Students’ Voice: Practical Guidance from the University of Teacher Education Vaud in Switzerland

Room: Advance HE Pre-function Area
Paola Ricciardi Joos, Frédéric Thurre
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
At the University of Teacher Education Vaud, Switzerland, the quality of teaching is assessed by selecting a sample of modules every semester and inviting all enrolled students to evaluate them by completing an online questionnaire. Based on these data, the direction asks that an annual result is computed for the whole institution. How to calculate this overall score, so that it accurately mirrors the students’ voice? Viewing student ratings as data rather than as evaluations, we point out that the chosen statistical model underlying the calculations has considerable influence on the results and thereby on the actions to be taken.  
8:30am to 9:30am
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Scenario Based Learning to Support Diversity and Inclusion

Room: Dunwoody C
Tahirah Walker
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
With a strong focus on diversity, higher education leaders are emphasizing a need for increased self-awareness and ability to recognize and work with cultural differences, including in international settings (Martin & Vaughn, 2007).  To fulfill this cultural competence outcome, we constructed several scenarios that focus on teaching, research and service from STEM, social sciences and business disciplines. Diversity and inclusion concepts are embedded in each scenario (Adams, Bell, Goodman & Joshi, 2016). In small groups, participants will engage in the scenarios along with reflective writing and discussion activities as they acquire the tools to prepare, implement and evaluate scenario-based learning.      

Developing Educational Leaders

Room: Dunwoody B
Pam Parker, Susannah Quinsee
Session Track: Organizational Development
It has been recognised by Stefani (2015) that educational leadership is an under researched area and yet this is an increasingly important skillset today in the UK with the introduction of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF). This workshop will offer findings from some ongoing research into what educational leadership is, what knowledge, skills and development are needed for this role, what challenges there are and, tips on how to make educational leadership positive. Participants will be able to reflect on and discuss their own experiences in light of this research.  

Creating a Usable Educational Development Assessment Plan

Room: Dunwoody A
Tris Utschig
Session Track: Assessment and Evaluation
Can we meaningfully assess educational development impact, yet avoid the time-intensive, challenging task of providing proof of improved student learning? Join us to develop a meaningful, usable assessment plan for your local educational development activities based on a new, comprehensive framework. We will address event, participation, and satisfaction data; build to evidence of faculty learning including intent to change and outcomes produced; and culminate with value we provide in creating a scholarly teaching community welcoming all voices. You will leave with an outline for a focused assessment plan specific to your context and feedback from colleagues about your plan.
9:45am to 11:15am
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What does ‘student voice’ mean to students and does anyone listen to it?

Room: Dunwoody A
George Mindano
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
‘Student voice’ continues to play an increasingly prominent role in higher education policy and debate. However, although ‘student voice’ has become crucial in contemporary higher education, this qualitative study answers important questions missing in literature. These include: what student voice means to the wider student body, what motivates them to express their voice, if they think they have a voice and if anyone listens to it. The paper will explore findings from a research project in which I draw upon data from focus group discussions with students and interviews with academic staff and senior academic leaders from four UK universities.

Peer Review Professional Development of Academic Teaching Staff in the Netherlands: Setting a benchmark for further improvement

Room: Dunwoody C
Jaap Mulder, Riekje de Jong
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Over 75% of teaching staff at 14 research universities (most are top -200 universities) meets the requirements for the mutually recognized University Teaching Qualification (UTQ). This calls for a new step. In 2016-2017 a peer review procedure was introduced to improve the quality of the UTQ, Continuous Professional Development and Leaderships Programmes. Stakeholders (students, lecturers, deans of education, programme directors, HR experts- and educational developers) discussed the above at four conferences, which were organized and hosted by a cluster of three or four universities. The aim of this nationwide peer review is to set a new benchmark: results, recommendations for universities, main trends, good practices and recommendations for future development.

Educated voices – Utilizing pedagogically trained teachers in universities

Room: Dunwoody B
Matti Lappalainen
Session Track: Organizational Development
In the session the ways how the participants of professional development courses are and could be utilized in universities for personal and for organizational purposes after the courses are tackled. The participants of the same course share same experiences and have had significant conversations during and after courses. They have “educated voices”. How could these voices be heard in changing universities? First the results of a national survey to universities are presented. Also the utilization ideas of participants after two long-lasting development programme are described. After that the participants of the session have an opportunity to share their own experiences and ideas as well as elaborate new ones.  

Democratisation of Education Using School Governing Board Members in Zambia: Voices from School Governors

Room: Gardenia
Eunifridah Simuyaba
Session Track: Organizational Development
 The intent of the study was to establish whether or not school governing bodies enable or disable democracy at a secondary school level in Zambia. A qualitative research design was adopted to unearth the practices of school governing board members. The findings of this study revealed that while the democratic practices were noted in schools, the issues of participation and leadership practices are on the other hand failing to have a significant impact on democratic practice in schools. The paper concludes by advocating for improved institutional and school-based democratic leadership practices that are in line with systemic policies.  

The process for developing an instrument for education research: An example of the Technology-Enabled Active Learning Inventory (TEAL)

Room: Camellia
Josephine M Csete, Ronnie Shroff, Fridolin Ting
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Valid and reliable measurement is the cornerstone of scholarly research.  Yet educational research involves humans as subjects and often is attempting to collect evidence of change after very short exposures is challenged to demonstrate the veracity of findings.  This paper will briefly identify the common challenges professional developers face when working with discipline experts on teaching and learning studies.  It will then link these challenges to the “big issues” for all forms of research, before presenting the main focus which is the process and key methodological stages for creating a valid and reliable instrument for educational research.  

Using the Critical Friends’ Approach and the Metacognitive Approach in Faculty Development Initiatives for Teaching in Higher Education

Room: Dunwoody C
Mervin Chisholm
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The critical friends’ approach to faculty development for teaching in university and college settings calls for engagement in personal reflective practice and the use of peer review to look at ones pedagogical skills.  In the metacognitive approach, a must think about ones learning. A critical friend is seen as a trusted colleague who asks provocative questions and pushes the teacher/learner to look in analytical ways at personal teaching skills. This paper looks at how this approach can inform activities for pedagogical development.

Effect of Computer-Supported Collaborative Teaching Strategy on Academic Achievement and Retention of Senior Secondary School Students in Biology in Imo, Nigeria

Room: Dunwoody A
Gertrude Ezekoka, LUCIA AGOMUO
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
This study adopted a quasi experimental design. Four research questions and four hypotheses guided the study. A sample of 87 SSII biology students was drawn from two coeducational secondary schools in Owerri of Imo State. Two instruments namely the Biology Achievement Test and Biology Retention Test were used. Mean and standard deviation were used to answer the research questions while the hypotheses were tested using ANCOVA at 0.05 level of significance. The findings showed that CSCTS is effective in the improvement of students' academic achievement in Biology, improves student’s retention, and gender has not effect on the use of CSCTS.

Why the Guiding Coalition Can be the Catalyst for Organizational Culture Change

Room: Gardenia
Dina Battaglia
Session Track: Organizational Development
The Proposed Model for Center Success (2016), which is based upon aspects of various leadership theories, provides a systematic approach for campus-wide teaching and learning culture and organizational change. The primary focus of this session is learning how to “get the right people on the bus” when building a guiding coalition (stage three of the model). Facilitating the guiding coalition’s identification of its “why’s” (Sinek, 2009) allows faculty to find their individual and collective voices. These individual and collective faculty voices from disciplines across campus will prove to be the catalyst for organizational change. Participants in this session will discuss the building of a guiding coalition at their home institution with prompts to also help them find their “why.”

Evaluating emerging scholars of teaching and learning

Room: Camellia
Yngve Troye Nordkvelle
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Academic development(AD) programs in Norway have inadequate traditions for measuring the effects of their activities. This paper will report from a small AD-program, based on a long-term collaboration between three higher education institutions in a predominantly rural area in the centre of Norway. Based on longitudinal data and assessment data from recent years, the paper explores how teachers graduating from the program express changes in how they teach, supervise and assess student work. One finding is that graduates develop a vocabulary for teaching and learning which makes them able to elevate and refine discussions and dare to change their ways of teaching.

Appraisal of Academic Writing Hideaway Platforms: Giving Voice to Heirs

Room: Dunwoody B
Mosimaneotsile Madoc Mohlake, Taurai Hungwe, DIKELEDI THIPE
Session Track: Adjunct Professional Development
Many academics in the South African higher learning institutions (HLIs) do not reflect an inclination towards embarking in research; more especially among historically black universities (HBU) whose faculty are predominantly African heirs of oral culture (also known as orature), to whom writing is not yet second nature. Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University (SMU) in South Africa is one university with a low production of research but of late has valiantly embarked on a project to establish an academic support monograph aimed at improving the learning and teaching scholarship. This study presents voiced experiences of the participants of the workshops that took place for the writing of the envisaged SMU monograph.

Curriculum Design in Afghanistan

Room: Dunwoody A
Stefan Braun
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
The Academic Mining Education in Afghanistan (AMEA) project (2014 to 2017) supports the training of highly qualified specialists and managerial staff in the Afghan mining industry. In order to use the potential of the mining industry for the country as a whole, the training of specialists, especially university teachers, in this area needs improvement. The objective of the project is therefore to modernise academic mining education in Afghanistan and to adapt it to the requirements of the market. This presentation will show the experiences made within this project by facilitating the processes of curriculumdesign in five cases over a duration of 2 years.  

From faculty good practices to needs for educational development: a qualitative and latent class analysis in seven Italian Universities

Room: Dunwoody C
Anna Serbati, Ettore Felisatti, Debora Aquario, Omar Paccagnella, Lorenza Da Re
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The paper presents the results emerged from a survey completed by university teachers belonging to 7 Italian universities. A total of 4289 academics answered three open-ended questions about: innovative practices developed in teaching; critical aspects; needs for improvement. Answers were analyzed using content analysis. A total of 5130 codes (innovative teaching practices), 3812 (critical aspects) and 3136 (support) were created. A latent class analysis was performed on this data to create distinct group profiles according to different combinations of teaching aspects reported in the answers. The paper discusses emerging elements to inform staff development processes.

Supporting Collaborative SoTL Learning Communities: Faculty Voices

Room: Camellia
Claudia A Cornejo Happel, Xiaomei Song
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
Faculty Learning Communities (FLC) encouraging SoTL research are offered at many teaching centers, but limited research examines faculty perspectives on SoTL collaboration and perceived effectiveness of FLCs. Using a mixed-methods research design our team investigated facilitators and barriers of SoTL engagement and collaboration and the impact of collaborative SoTL research on faculty teaching, scholarship, and community involvement. The study provides insights for enhancing institutional SoTL programming changes and understanding faculty motivations for engaging in SoTL. Presenters will discuss differentiated support for faculty engagement with SoTL and ideas for assessing and addressing SoTL needs with session attendees.

Teaching Teachers for Creative Teaching: The Role of Teaching Centers in Higher Education

Room: Dunwoody B
Susana Gonçalves
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This paper addresses the activities and rationale behind the creation of CINEP, the teaching center of the Polytechnic of Coimbra, Portugal. The ultimate goal of this center is to promote innovation, quality and excellence in higher education. The idea goes back to 2007 and has evolved from a very structured and formal project to a more unconventional, innovative and creative plan of actions. Current activities (training, publications, production of pedagogical resources and activities supporting communities of practice) will be described and its rationale underlined. The project is informed by and connected to the recent literature and research on SOTL.  

How can a top-down initiative support change and development bottom-up? The case of Norwegian Centres for Excellence in Education

Room: Gardenia
Oddfrid Førland, Helen Bråten
Session Track: Organizational Development
In this paper we discuss how national excellence initiatives with a top-down approach can generate bottom-up change and enhancement at the local, institutional and sectoral level. By studying the national initiative Norwegian Centres for Excellence in Education and bioCEED – Centre for Excellence in Biology Education, we argue that the national programme have succeeded in driving institutional change from a local level. The paper discusses how national agencies can be a partner in development and create programmes to foster change from within with low fidelity governance approaches (Land and Gordon 2015) focusing on responsibility, and not accountability and control, and long-term developments.

Student Course Representatives: Voice and Power

Room: Dunwoody A
Jennie Winter
Session Track: Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL)
  The democratisation of HE has transformed the way that students and universities interrelate, characterised by a re-distribution of power and new ways of working and learning together. As part of this development, the role of Course Representative (CR) is increasingly viewed as an agent for the student voice across the sector. However, there is an emerging critique which challenges assumptions that representation is inherently ‘good’ and calls for deeper, critical examination of the CR role. This paper presents empirical work which explores how voice and power play out in the experiences of CRs at a modern university in the UK.

The Role of Academic Developers in the Process of Peer Review of Teaching

Room: Dunwoody C
Anu Sarv, Mari Karm
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
The value of peer review process is guaranteed by the participation of the academic developer (Bell & Cooper,2013). However, some authors (Yiend, Weller & Kinchin,2014) argue that academic developers do not have enough field-knowledge to support the development of the university teacher. As academic developers act on the margins, they have to constantly conceptualize their role in different situations (Green & Little,2013; Handal,2008). The survey investigates how academic developers percieve their role in the process of peer review and how it is percieved  by university teachers in the same process. The research data is based on observation log notes and interviews. The results show that academic developers and teachers both perceived the transformation of their roles during the peer reivew process as the result of the councious contribution of the developer

How do you design for active learning in an online, self-paced course?

Room: Camellia
Inger-Marie Falgren Christensen, Christopher Kjær, Pernille Stenkil Hansen
Session Track: Technology
Today there is a gap between the enthusiasm for educational technology at management, government and industry level and the actual use of educational technology in HE. Flexible, professional development is needed to support teachers in acquiring the knowledge, skills and competences needed to bridge this gap and secure successful implementation. In this presentation, we will share a learning design for an online, self-paced course for teachers. We will account for the theoretical underpinnings, present evaluation results and discuss the potentials and challenges of online, self-paced courses.

Teaching and Learning Centres and their Institutional Identity

Room: Dunwoody B
Erica Jung
Session Track: Organizational Development
Teaching and Learning Centres have evolved from their original focus on instructional skills to a more fulsome institutional identity as agents of change managing initiatives around issues of teaching and learning. The power of the TLCs comes from the knowledge and skills of the professional staff and the neutral positioning of TLCs outside of Administration and Faculties. They are not simply the support for the professoriate nor solely the mouthpiece for the Senior Administration's agenda. This intersection is where TLCs find themselves situated as we take on the broader mission of teaching and learning.  

Educational ambassadorship: an approach to institutional change

Room: Gardenia
Klara Bolander Laksov
Session Track: Organizational Development
After the collapse of the previous academic development unit (ADU) at a large Swedish university, I was asked in 2015 to build up a new ADU. I inherited a generous budget and six academic developers. My goal was threefold: to build capacity to inspire and generate educational development; to establish communities of practice around teaching and learning at the departmental level; and to develop an institutional culture built on sharing and collaboration and in line with the scholarship of teaching and learning. In this presentation, I share what we did and the findings based on interviews with 24 participants.   
9:45am to 10:45am
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The Power of Phenomenology in Teaching and Learning

Room: Oakwood A
Mays Imad
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
Strong educational institutions foster the development of skills citizens need to innovate and produce tangible results, bolstering economies and sustaining progress.  Do students care about self-transformation and acquiring contemplative skills or is their primary focus to become workforce competitive?  This workshop will examine faculty perception of the purpose of higher education according to their students.  Does their understanding align with their students'?  Workshop participants will explore concrete, evidence-informed strategies to (1) align what students expect from their education with what faculty think; (2) transform the classroom into a sanctuary where all students can explore life, the inner and the outer.  

Brain-based Coaching Strategies for Academic Leaders

Room: Maplewood B
Susan Robison
Session Track: Organizational Development
Department chairs often enter their positions with reluctance and little training. The interpersonal aspects of the job, e.g. annual reviews, performance evaluations, or other difficult conversations with faculty, can be especially challenging to the inexperienced chair. In this workshop, you will learn several powerful brain-based coaching skills to increase your skills and confidence for leadership that matters: transformational conversations that build institutional collegiality, civility, and engagement. During the workshop, you will practice skills in dyads and then shape a facilitator/volunteer demonstration of these skills. Participants will receive the curriculum of a one-year “Leaders as Coaches” program.    

The role of academic developers in embedding high-impact undergraduate research and inquiry in mainstream higher education: Twenty years’ reflection

Room: Maplewood A
Mick Healey
Session Track: Teaching and Learning
This workshop focuses on the changing role of academic developers in supporting and influencing undergraduate research and inquiry (UGRI), a high-impact activity. We examine the levels at which academic developers can influence UGRI practices by distinguishing between staff and student practices; disciplinary and departmental practices and policies; institutional practices and policies; and national and international practices and policies. Drawing on our international experiences over the last 20 years, we discuss the widening of academic development practice and consider who the academic developers are, now and in the future, when it comes to UGRI in mainstream HE. 

Gamifying Faculty Development

Room: Conference Center
Scott Phillips
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
This session will demonstrate how gamification can be used to motivate faculty to participate in teacher development activities. After incorporating gaming strategies and rewards including points, badges, and passports to workshops and teacher certification programs, participation at CTL events significantly increased. Additionally, the gamified system was so popular, other university organizations partnered with the CTL to offer programming. Before gamification, the CTL offered 19 workshops per semester in two series, and monthly event attendance averaged 25 participants. Currently, over 90 workshops are offered per semester in sixteen workshop series, and average attendance is over 300 participants per month.  

Contextual educational development: Leveraging positionality to build trust locally

Room: Oakwood B
David Green, Deandra Little
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
When consulting with academics and administrators, educational developers essentially act as purveyors of “second-hand knowledge.” Frequently, we encourage colleagues to implement strategies they have not experienced or discovered first-hand, which they may doubt or question. How do we engender trust such that our “cognitive authority” (Wilson, 1983) helps improve student learning or promote institutional change? In this workshop, we introduce a framework for understanding what components of our identities and power contribute to making us credible cognitive authorities, discuss how to demonstrate these in practice, and evaluate which aspects we might best highlight or tailor to our own local contexts.
11:30am to 12:30pm
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Keynote Session: Reimagining the Place of Students in Educational Development

Room: Ravinia Ballroom
Peter Felten
Session Track: Faculty and Staff Professional Development
Many educational developers have become champions of partnering with students. A 2016 special issue of the International Journal for Academic Development, for instance, featured emerging partnership practices and research from half a dozen countries. Taking this movement one step further, an influential publication from the UK’s Higher Education Academy – authored by prominent developers – contends that “engaging students and staff effectively as partners in learning and teaching is arguably one of the most important issues facing higher education in the 21st century” (Healey, Flint, and Harrington 2014, p. 7). In this interactive session, we will critically explore the purposes and practices of partnering with students in educational development. Many partnership initiatives insert a few students into an ongoing program or initiative. This approach often enriches the experiences of and outcomes for all involved, but does it go far enough to enact the values of partnership and to counter the consumerist forces shaping higher education? What if we reimagine the place of students in educational development? This session is an invitation for developers, reflecting on their own distinct contexts, to consider why and how students could be allies and agents in “the creation of conditions supportive of teaching and learning, in the broadest sense” (Leibowitz, 2014, p. 3).